Chiropractic Health & Wellness Blog

Lyn Lake Chiropractic

Running Shoe, Which is right for you!

March 26, 2014

Which Type of Running Shoe Is Right for You?

Because runners with different arch heights are prone to different injuries, running shoe manufacturers have developed motion-control, stability and cushion running shoes for low-, neutral- and high-arched runners, respectively.

To control the excessive pronation present in low-arched individuals, motion-control running shoes have added midsole material beneath the center of the arch. On the other side of the spectrum, cushion Quick read more or view full article running shoes are made for runners with high arches and are manufactured with a curve-lasted shape designed to fit the typical high-arched foot.

In order to improve shock absorption, the midsoles in cushion running shoes are significantly softer. To fit runners with neutral feet, stability running shoes are made with semi-curved lasts and only a moderate amount of midsole cushioning.

For more than 30 years, running shoe manufacturers have suggested that prescribing running shoes based on arch height will reduce injury rates and increase comfort. Surprisingly, despite the fact that consumers have spent billions of dollars for just the right running shoe, there is conflicting evidence suggesting the prescription of running shoes based on arch height is clinically justified.

Arch Height, Shoe Type and Injury Rates

In one of the largest studies done to date, Knapik, et al., divided 1,400 male and female Marine Corps recruits into two groups: an experimental group in which running shoe recommendation was based on arch height, and a control group that wore neutral stability running shoes regardless of arch height. After the subjects completed an intensive 12-week training regimen, the authors concluded that prescribing running shoes according to arch height was not necessary, since there was no difference in injury rates between the two groups.

In another study evaluating the value of prescribing running shoes according to arch height, Ryan, et al., categorized 81 female runners as supinators, neutral or pronators, and then randomly assigned them to wear neutral, stability or motion-control running shoes. Again, the authors concluded that there was no correlation between foot type, running shoe use and the frequency of reported pain.

One of the more interesting findings of this research was that the individuals classified as pronators reported greater levels of pain when wearing the motion-control running shoes. This is consistent with the hypothesis that excessive midsole thickness may dampen sensory input, amplifying the potential for injury because the athlete can't "feel the ground."

Supporting the belief that running shoe prescription should continue to be based on arch height, several high-quality laboratory studies have shown that the different types of running shoes actually do what they are supposed to do: Motion-control running shoes have been proven to limit pronation, and cushion running shoes have been proven to improve shock absorption.

To prove this, researchers measured arch height and evaluated impact forces, tibial accelerations, and the range and speed of pronation after high- and low-arched runners were randomly assigned to wear cushion and motion-control running shoes. The detailed analysis confirmed that motion-control running shoes do, in fact, control rearfoot motion better than cushion running shoes; and cushion running shoes attenuate shock better than motion-control running shoes.

In a study evaluating the effect of motion-control versus neutral shoes on overpronators, Cheung and Ng used electrical devices to measure muscle activity as subjects ran 10 kilometers. The authors noted that when wearing motion-control shoes, runners who pronated excessively reported reduced muscular fatigue in the front and sides of their legs.

In a separate study of excessive supinators, Wegener, et al., evaluated pressure along the bottom of the foot when high-arched individuals wore either cushion running shoes or motion-control shoes. The authors confirmed that the cushion running shoes more effectively distributed pressure and were perceived as being more comfortable than the motion-control running shoes.

The results of the previously listed studies suggest the practice of choosing running shoes based on arch height has merit, particularly for people on the far ends of the arch height spectrum.

Which Running Shoe? The Most Important Factors to Consider

When you look at all of the research evaluating running shoe prescription and injury, it becomes clear that the most important factors to consider when selecting a running shoe are that it fits the foot perfectly (width, length and shape), and that the midsole is comfortable. The size of the shoe is determined by matching the widest part of the forefoot to the widest part of the toe box, and there should be a few millimeters of space between the tip of the longest toe and the end of the running shoe. The shoe's upper also should comfortably fit the shape of the foot.

An important factor to consider when prescribing a running shoe is that the midsole should also be selected in part by running style: Heel strikers often need additional cushioning beneath the rearfoot, while midfoot strikers typically prefer zero-drop midsoles. In almost all situations, even extremely flat-footed runners should think twice about wearing heavy motion- control running shoes because they may dampen sensory input from the foot and their extreme stiffness often results in ankle and/or knee injuries.

In order to identify the midsole that is right, experiment with a range of running shoes until you find just the right thickness, stiffness and downward slope.

Though rarely discussed, perhaps the most important attributes of a midsole is its overall stiffness. In my experience, the stiffness of a running shoe midsole is the most important factor associated with comfort and injury prevention. You can easily evaluate midsole stiffness by twisting it in several directions while grabbing the heel and forefoot.

There is a surprising amount of variation in midsole stiffness, as running shoes will bend with anywhere from 5-50 pounds of force. The best running shoes will bend with very little pressure, allowing your feet to move freely in all directions.

Unfortunately, manufacturers rarely provide information regarding overall stiffness, and it is important for runners to know the precise degree of midsole stiffness that is most comfortable for them. High-arched runners tend to be drawn to extremely flexible midsoles, while low-arched runners usually prefer a slightly stiffer midsole. The extremely stiff midsoles are almost universally uncomfortable.

The bottom line with all the research on running shoe prescription is that you are always the best judge of which running shoe is right for you. However, keep in mind that heavy motion-control shoes may interfere with proprioception, while minimalist running shoes, such as the "five-finger" running shoes, are too thin to provide adequate protection and have recently been proven to produce very high injury rates. As a general rule, most runners will do best with lightweight stability shoes that match the shape of their feet.

Thomas Michaud, DC, is the author of Injury-Free Running

We thought this was a good article for runners looking for shoes and questions they can ask at the running stores when your buying a new pair of shoes.  If you have any type of running injuries with foot pain, ankle pain, achiile pain and knee pain please feel free to contact Lyn Lake Chiropractic or find a good sports chiropractor

 

Read Less

Running Shoe, Which is right for you!

March 26, 2014

Which Type of Running Shoe Is Right for You?

Because runners with different arch heights are prone to different injuries, running shoe manufacturers have developed motion-control, stability and cushion running shoes for low-, neutral- and high-arched runners, respectively.

To control the excessive pronation present in low-arched individuals, motion-control running shoes have added midsole material beneath the center of the arch. On the other side of the spectrum, cushion Quick read more or view full article running shoes are made for runners with high arches and are manufactured with a curve-lasted shape designed to fit the typical high-arched foot.

In order to improve shock absorption, the midsoles in cushion running shoes are significantly softer. To fit runners with neutral feet, stability running shoes are made with semi-curved lasts and only a moderate amount of midsole cushioning.

For more than 30 years, running shoe manufacturers have suggested that prescribing running shoes based on arch height will reduce injury rates and increase comfort. Surprisingly, despite the fact that consumers have spent billions of dollars for just the right running shoe, there is conflicting evidence suggesting the prescription of running shoes based on arch height is clinically justified.

Arch Height, Shoe Type and Injury Rates

In one of the largest studies done to date, Knapik, et al., divided 1,400 male and female Marine Corps recruits into two groups: an experimental group in which running shoe recommendation was based on arch height, and a control group that wore neutral stability running shoes regardless of arch height. After the subjects completed an intensive 12-week training regimen, the authors concluded that prescribing running shoes according to arch height was not necessary, since there was no difference in injury rates between the two groups.

In another study evaluating the value of prescribing running shoes according to arch height, Ryan, et al., categorized 81 female runners as supinators, neutral or pronators, and then randomly assigned them to wear neutral, stability or motion-control running shoes. Again, the authors concluded that there was no correlation between foot type, running shoe use and the frequency of reported pain.

One of the more interesting findings of this research was that the individuals classified as pronators reported greater levels of pain when wearing the motion-control running shoes. This is consistent with the hypothesis that excessive midsole thickness may dampen sensory input, amplifying the potential for injury because the athlete can't "feel the ground."

Supporting the belief that running shoe prescription should continue to be based on arch height, several high-quality laboratory studies have shown that the different types of running shoes actually do what they are supposed to do: Motion-control running shoes have been proven to limit pronation, and cushion running shoes have been proven to improve shock absorption.

To prove this, researchers measured arch height and evaluated impact forces, tibial accelerations, and the range and speed of pronation after high- and low-arched runners were randomly assigned to wear cushion and motion-control running shoes. The detailed analysis confirmed that motion-control running shoes do, in fact, control rearfoot motion better than cushion running shoes; and cushion running shoes attenuate shock better than motion-control running shoes.

In a study evaluating the effect of motion-control versus neutral shoes on overpronators, Cheung and Ng used electrical devices to measure muscle activity as subjects ran 10 kilometers. The authors noted that when wearing motion-control shoes, runners who pronated excessively reported reduced muscular fatigue in the front and sides of their legs.

In a separate study of excessive supinators, Wegener, et al., evaluated pressure along the bottom of the foot when high-arched individuals wore either cushion running shoes or motion-control shoes. The authors confirmed that the cushion running shoes more effectively distributed pressure and were perceived as being more comfortable than the motion-control running shoes.

The results of the previously listed studies suggest the practice of choosing running shoes based on arch height has merit, particularly for people on the far ends of the arch height spectrum.

Which Running Shoe? The Most Important Factors to Consider

When you look at all of the research evaluating running shoe prescription and injury, it becomes clear that the most important factors to consider when selecting a running shoe are that it fits the foot perfectly (width, length and shape), and that the midsole is comfortable. The size of the shoe is determined by matching the widest part of the forefoot to the widest part of the toe box, and there should be a few millimeters of space between the tip of the longest toe and the end of the running shoe. The shoe's upper also should comfortably fit the shape of the foot.

An important factor to consider when prescribing a running shoe is that the midsole should also be selected in part by running style: Heel strikers often need additional cushioning beneath the rearfoot, while midfoot strikers typically prefer zero-drop midsoles. In almost all situations, even extremely flat-footed runners should think twice about wearing heavy motion- control running shoes because they may dampen sensory input from the foot and their extreme stiffness often results in ankle and/or knee injuries.

In order to identify the midsole that is right, experiment with a range of running shoes until you find just the right thickness, stiffness and downward slope.

Though rarely discussed, perhaps the most important attributes of a midsole is its overall stiffness. In my experience, the stiffness of a running shoe midsole is the most important factor associated with comfort and injury prevention. You can easily evaluate midsole stiffness by twisting it in several directions while grabbing the heel and forefoot.

There is a surprising amount of variation in midsole stiffness, as running shoes will bend with anywhere from 5-50 pounds of force. The best running shoes will bend with very little pressure, allowing your feet to move freely in all directions.

Unfortunately, manufacturers rarely provide information regarding overall stiffness, and it is important for runners to know the precise degree of midsole stiffness that is most comfortable for them. High-arched runners tend to be drawn to extremely flexible midsoles, while low-arched runners usually prefer a slightly stiffer midsole. The extremely stiff midsoles are almost universally uncomfortable.

The bottom line with all the research on running shoe prescription is that you are always the best judge of which running shoe is right for you. However, keep in mind that heavy motion-control shoes may interfere with proprioception, while minimalist running shoes, such as the "five-finger" running shoes, are too thin to provide adequate protection and have recently been proven to produce very high injury rates. As a general rule, most runners will do best with lightweight stability shoes that match the shape of their feet.

Thomas Michaud, DC, is the author of Injury-Free Running

We thought this was a good article for runners looking for shoes and questions they can ask at the running stores when your buying a new pair of shoes.  If you have any type of running injuries with foot pain, ankle pain, achiile pain and knee pain please feel free to contact Lyn Lake Chiropractic or find a good sports chiropractor

 

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Running injuries

August 22, 2011
Twin Cities Marathon and Twin Cities 10 miler is only 41 days.  If your training for the great Twin Cities Marathon please take the time to heal between your long runs. Remember when you start having any type of pain, Achilles tendonitis, ITB issues, knee pain, hip pain or foot pain,  please get checked out right away. The quicker you get treated, the quicker you will heal to continue your training for the big day!

We see so many athletes that train so hard for a race and they start having pain they either keep running or ignore the issue until the race get's close.  Then, they come in, take the extra time and get treated right away!  Don't wait!!, Our chiropractors have helped thousands of runners and have the knowledge and expertise in treating running injuries.

Lyn Lake Chiropractic treat runners and have amazing results!

Sports chiropractic is a natural health care...

April 26, 2011
Lyn Lake Chiropractic Specializes in treating Sports Injuries. They work with kids, weekend athletes, high school and college athletes, and pro athletes. Anyone that is active can end up with a sports injury that would benefit from being treated by a sports Minneapolis chiropractic clinic.

Many amateur and professional athletes are sidelined with injuries that could be avoided. Others sit it out on the bench because their injury does not respond to ordinary treatment. Still, others are playing, but at less than peak efficiency, simply because their structural system is not balance. Progressive coaches, athletes, and doctors are realizing that pain killing drugs are not the answer. They merely cover up the symptoms, deceiving the athlete into actions which could make the injury more serious and longer lasting. 

Lyn Lake Chiropractic's approach to health closely relates to the needs of the sports participant. Most sports involve body contact, fast Quick read more or view full article starts and stops, and body positioning that places an unusual amount of strain on the back and structural system. Lyn Lake Chiropractic considers a person as an integrated being, giving special attention to the spine, joints, muscles, tendons, ligaments, and nerves. 

Sports chiropractic is a natural health care method that stresses the importance of keeping all the systems of the body functioning efficiently so the player enjoys peak performance, experiences a minimum injury risk, and has fast recuperative powers. 

Many world class and Olympic athletes, as well as professional stars and teams, have retained sports chiropractors to provide care. Joe Montana, Nolan Ryan, Muhammad Ali, Kareem Abdul-Jubbar, and Carl Lewis all utilize chiropractic care. The Players Association of the NFL has officially incorporated sports chiropractors as a regular part of care. Chiropractors have been selected as attending doctors at the Olympic Games and at national and world championships in track and field, cycling, volleyball, powerlifting, aerobics, and triathlons. Lyn Lake Chiropractic will not only help get you out of pain, but will try to find the cause so your symptoms don't return.

"Lifting weights and seeing a chiropractor on a regular basis has made me a better golfer. I've been going to a chiropractor for as long as I can remember. It's as important to my training as practicing my swing."   – Tiger Woods.

Running injuries, plantar fasciitis, knee pain, and foot pain can be treated with chiropractic.

Shin Splints
This running injury often causes pain along either side of the lower leg. Symptoms vary greatly from dull tightness to a painful area along the lower leg. Injuries have a higher incidence of occurrence in athletes starting a new running or aerobic program. 

Achilles Tendonitis
Inflammation of the tendon that connects the calf muscle to the heel. Can be stiff at the beginning of a run and feel better during the workout. Pain varies from dull ache to acute, knife-like pain. Which can cause pain with Achilles Tendonitis while running or walking.

Stress Fracture
Usually located in either the lower leg (tibia or fibula) or one of the metatarsals (toes), the 2nd and 3rd toes being the most common. This type of running injury can be difficult to diagnose in its early stages and can be confused with shin splints. 

Runners Knee
Knee Pain
Usual symptoms of this running injury include pain directly under the kneecap, or the surrounding area. Climbing or descending stairs may cause knee pain. Usually the runners knee - running injury responds well our minneapolis chiropractor.
Heel Pain - Arch Pain - Plantar Fasciitis

Plantar fasciitis
Foot Pain
Common type of running injury - varies from a slight tightness in the bottom of the foot to an intense heel pain that may worsen when getting out of bed in the morning and then lessen after a few steps. The pain is often reproduced if the toes are dorsiflexed (pulled up). An X-ray will sometimes reveal the running injury, known as plantar fasciitis, (foot pain) as a "heel spur" on the bottom of the heel. This running injury is usually due to an over pronation of the foot and ankle while walking and running. 

With plantar fasciitis, the pain is more severe when running on the balls of the feet. If pain is more intense on heel contact, a condition called Heel Spur Syndrome could be present. Heel Spurs result from excessive ossification (bone formation) due to the constant pulling of the fascia at the point where the fascia inserts on the bottom of the heel, this can be extremely painful. Minneapolis Chiropractors can help with this issue with adjusting your feet, ankle and extremities, massage, ultrasound, laser, taping. Our Lyn Lake Chiropractic Chiropractors would be glad to assess your shoes, running shoes or sport shoes and suggest the proper shoe your body needs to help correct the problem.

Ilio-Tibial Band Syndrome
These running injuries can manifest themselves anywhere along the entire length of this highly fibrous connective tissue running from the top of the hip to just below the knee. At its worst, pain can be very intense at either the outside of the hip to the outside of the knee. A complete biomechanical evaluation, foot to hip, is needed to diagnose the problem and prevent further running injuries. Stretching can aggravate running injuries of this type.

Want to stay up to date on the best tips to avoid running injuries? 
Call Lyn Lake Chiropractic. Read Less

More Injuries As Runners Head Outside

March 4, 2011
By Reg Chapman, WCCO-TV - News March 2011

MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — No matter how cold it gets, hardcore runners will always train. So, this winter has been rough.

Doctors across the metro are seeing an increase in people coming to their offices with injuries related to running on snow and ice.

Lots of snow, ice and fluctuating temperatures have left many of the trails and paths hard to navigate.

“I have a calf strain and that’s mainly because of the winter conditions, uneven pavement and ice and snow,” said runner Eric Hoglund.
Hoglund’s training for the Boston Marathon is on hold until the doctors at Lyn Lake Chiropractic help heal what hurts him.

Lyn Lake Chiropractic seen a steady flow of runners coming in with injuries.
“A lot of calfs, foot pain and ankle pain, hamstrings and then low back pain injuries. That seems to be the biggest thing now, due to the snow and ice,” said Quick read more or view full article Dr. Jill Field from Lyn Lake Chiropractic.

Dr. Jill Field says running where the ground is not clear is the cause of most runner’s pain.

“The foot hits the ground, it has a little bit more wobble to it, because it’s not a firm solid surface and then the hamstrings come into play because now we are trying to push off, but when we push off, the foot slips a little bit, “said Dr. Field.

While Dr. Jill Field chiropractor at Lyn Lake Chiropractic helps heal, John Long, the owner at Marathon Sports, is helping people feel a bit more at ease running in winter conditions.

All his employees are runners. They’ve been posting conditions of the trails around the lakes, the greenway and Minnehaha creek on the store’s Face book page. “The staff would say, ‘hey, this is what we thought the trails look like today’ and update and a lot of people on our face book would make their own comments, ” said Long.

Dr Jill Field says most runner’s injuries happen in the early morning, when the trails are icy or packed down and wobbly from lots of use the night before.
Chiropractors at Lyn Lake Chiropractic advice for runners: Know your limitations and if your body feels like it is working too hard to run, listen to it and slow down — at least until the snow and ice melts. Read Less

Get in Gear Race Saturday, April 24, 2010

March 28, 2010
Get in Gear
33rd Annual Rite of Spring!

Saturday, April 24, 2010

Lyn Lake Chiropractic is a proud supporter of the 33rd Annual Rite of Spring Get in Gear Race. Being the Official Chiropractors for the Medtronic Twin Cities Marathon we feel this race is the kick off for the running season in Minnesota.

We have seen many runner's already getting ready for the Get in Gear, Boston Marathon and many more races. Runners elite to beginners use the Get in Gear Race as a starting point to determine if they need to train harder and faster for more races to come.

While you're training and racing, remember to keep your body running as efficient as possible with having regular chiropractic care. If start to have any pain or discomfort ie: knee pain, foot Quick read more or view full article pain, achilles pain, shin splints, hip pain or lower back pain - when you start increasing your milage and/or speed workouts, get treated as soon as possible to avoid injuries that could stop you from training or racing this spring or summer.

Patients ask us when do you know if you need medical treatment? Our answer is when you start to have any pain. You shouldn't have any pain while running. Pain is the signal from the body telling you there's something wrong and you need to address this now, not later. Lyn Lake Chiropractic offer Free Consultation, use this consultation so we can help you determine if you need treatment.

Get in Gear is the Largest 10K in Minnesota.
Be apart of this awesome race!
You have many different races to pick from.

Runner Info:

Saturday, April 24, 2010
10K Run, 5K Run/Walk, 2K Fun Run & 1/2 Marathon

Location:

4801 Minnehaha Ave. South, Minneapolis, MN 55417

Start Times:
2K & FFF 2K: 8:00a.m.
10K & Half-Marathon: 9:00a.m.
(Note: Three hour limit. Roads open to public at Noon.)
5K: 9:20a.m.

ONLINE REGISTRATION
       Online Registration deadline 11:59pm, Thursday, April 22, 2010    
 Corporate Online Registration deadline April 16, 2010       
 Fit-For-Fun Online Registration deadline April 16, 2010

If you have any questions please contact Get in Gear

www.getingear10K.com Read Less

Plantar Fasciitis, Lyn Lake Chiropractic helps

September 5, 2009
Pain in my foot and heel? aka Plantar Fasciitis

What cause Plantar Fasciitis? Most runners have seem to at one time or another complain of feet/foot pain.

What causes Plantar Fasciitis is not well understood. It probably develops as the result of repeated small tears in the plantar fascia (bottom of your foot) When you walk, your plantar fascia stretches as your foot strikes the ground. If the plantar fascia is strained by the way you walk or run the repeated stress, it can become weak, swollen, and irritated inflamed and it can hurt when you stand, run or walk.
Conditions or activities that may lead to pain on bottom of your foot. Factors that affect how the feet work (biomechanical factors). These include abnormal inward twisting or rolling of the foot, pronation high arches, flat feet, tight calf muscles, or tight tendons at the back of the heel (Achilles tendons). Excessive pronation Quick read more or view full article is a common cause of plantar fasciitis.
  • Repetitive activities, such as prolonged walking or standing and/or running.
  • Factors that put extra stress on the feet, such as being overweight or wearing shoes that are poorly cushioned, don't fit well, or are worn out.
  • The natural process of aging. Plantar fasciitis is most common in middle-aged adults. Which cause pain on the bottom of your foot.

    The classic symptom of plantar fasciitis is heel pain when you take your first steps after getting out of bed or after sitting for a long period of time. You may also have:
  • Stiffness and pain in foot in the morning or after resting that gets better after a few steps but gets worse as the day progresses.
  • Pain that gets worse when you climb stairs or stand on your toes.
  • Pain after you stand for long periods.
  • Pain at the beginning of exercise that gets better or goes away as exercise continues but returns when exercise is completed, such as running.

    Treatment for plantar fasciitis at Lyn Lake Chiropractic by our minneapolis chiropractor:
  • Relieve inflammation and pain in the heel and foot, or feet. Allow small tears in the plantar fascia ligament to heal. At Lyn Lake Chiropractic we see and treated many plantar fasciitis pain, foot pain. Being the minneapolis chiropractic clinic and being the Official Chiropractor of The Medtronics Twin Cities Marathon we have to be able to deal, heal and relieve our runners from their plantar fasciitis pain

  • Our Treatment plan includes but not limited to Massage, A.R.T., Graston technique, ultrasound, laser treatment, Kinesio Taping ( Taped touted for speed healing injured muscles and athletic injuries.) adjustments to your feet to make sure your bones in your feet are working properly.

    We also like to do a gait analysis to make sure your in the correct running shoes if your a runner.
    The minneapolis chiropractors and being avid runners, we have had to deal with foot pain from time to time. But with the proper treatment we seem to continue running marathons. Healing time always depends on how long you had the pain and if your aggressive in your treatment. If you don't call Lyn Lake Chiropracic please seek medical advice right away when you start having ( foot pain )these symptoms. Rest is always the best advice, but most runners don't feel they have time not to run and want to heal fast. Call us at 612-879-8000 Lyn Lake Chiropractic located in uptown minneapolis. Read Less
    Posted by Dr Kevin Schreifels
    • Medtronic Twin Cities Marathon Sponsor
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