Chiropractic Health & Wellness Blog

Lyn Lake Chiropractic

Sports Injury? See Your Minneapolis Chiropractor!

September 29, 2015

Want to Prevent or Treat a Sports Injury? See Your Minneapolis Chiropractor!

 

While having any type of injury is obviously no fun, sports injuries can seem ten times worse. This is largely because, in addition to the pain and aggravation they usually cause, sports injuries can also keep you from engaging in the one activity that makes you smile and brings you joy. 

Quick read more or view full article style="font-size:14px;">So, preventing these types of injuries helps you live a happier life and one way to achieve that goal is to make (and keep) regular appointments with Lyn Lake Chiropractic, your Minneapolis chiropractor. How does chiropractic help you avoid sports injuries?

Chiropractic as a Sports Injury Preventative

The main reason chiropractic is such a great preventative for sports injuries is that keeping your spine aligned allows your brain to effectively communicate with the rest of your body via your central nervous system, which is housed in your spinal column. This means better muscle response, improved performance, and a whole host of other sports-related benefits in addition to fewer sports injuries.

In fact, research published in BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders confirms chiropractic’s injury prevention effect on the lower body. In this particular study, 59 semi-elite Australian Rules footballers were split into two groups. Both received medical and sports management, but only one (the intervention group) received sports chiropractic treatments—first weekly, then bi-weekly, then monthly—for a period of 7 ½ months.

Each athlete was assessed prior to the study, as well as at the end. Based on a comparison between the groups, researchers concluded that chiropractic helped lower the number of lower-limb injuries these elite athletes endured, primarily when it came to strains and non-contact knee injuries.

Chiropractic Also Beneficial Should An Injury Occur

Of course, in addition to chiropractic helping prevent sports injuries, it is also beneficial should an injury occur. That’s why an estimated one-third of all American NFL football teams have a chiropractor on staff with three-quarters of the teams having referred a player to a chiropractor, even if one wasn’t immediately available. 

The types of sports injuries that can often be treated with a visit or two to your Minneapolis chiropractor include: neck pain, headaches, sprains, knee injuries, tendonitis, shin splints, elbow injuries, and more.

To prevent or treat your sports injury, make an appointment with Lyn Lake Chiropractor today. We’re here to make all of our Minneapolis chiropractic patients feel better before, during, and after participating in their sport of choice!

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Running Shoe, Which is right for you!

March 26, 2014

Which Type of Running Shoe Is Right for You?

Because runners with different arch heights are prone to different injuries, running shoe manufacturers have developed motion-control, stability and cushion running shoes for low-, neutral- and high-arched runners, respectively.

To control the excessive pronation present in low-arched individuals, motion-control running shoes have added midsole material beneath the center of the arch. On the other side of the spectrum, cushion Quick read more or view full article running shoes are made for runners with high arches and are manufactured with a curve-lasted shape designed to fit the typical high-arched foot.

In order to improve shock absorption, the midsoles in cushion running shoes are significantly softer. To fit runners with neutral feet, stability running shoes are made with semi-curved lasts and only a moderate amount of midsole cushioning.

For more than 30 years, running shoe manufacturers have suggested that prescribing running shoes based on arch height will reduce injury rates and increase comfort. Surprisingly, despite the fact that consumers have spent billions of dollars for just the right running shoe, there is conflicting evidence suggesting the prescription of running shoes based on arch height is clinically justified.

Arch Height, Shoe Type and Injury Rates

In one of the largest studies done to date, Knapik, et al., divided 1,400 male and female Marine Corps recruits into two groups: an experimental group in which running shoe recommendation was based on arch height, and a control group that wore neutral stability running shoes regardless of arch height. After the subjects completed an intensive 12-week training regimen, the authors concluded that prescribing running shoes according to arch height was not necessary, since there was no difference in injury rates between the two groups.

In another study evaluating the value of prescribing running shoes according to arch height, Ryan, et al., categorized 81 female runners as supinators, neutral or pronators, and then randomly assigned them to wear neutral, stability or motion-control running shoes. Again, the authors concluded that there was no correlation between foot type, running shoe use and the frequency of reported pain.

One of the more interesting findings of this research was that the individuals classified as pronators reported greater levels of pain when wearing the motion-control running shoes. This is consistent with the hypothesis that excessive midsole thickness may dampen sensory input, amplifying the potential for injury because the athlete can't "feel the ground."

Supporting the belief that running shoe prescription should continue to be based on arch height, several high-quality laboratory studies have shown that the different types of running shoes actually do what they are supposed to do: Motion-control running shoes have been proven to limit pronation, and cushion running shoes have been proven to improve shock absorption.

To prove this, researchers measured arch height and evaluated impact forces, tibial accelerations, and the range and speed of pronation after high- and low-arched runners were randomly assigned to wear cushion and motion-control running shoes. The detailed analysis confirmed that motion-control running shoes do, in fact, control rearfoot motion better than cushion running shoes; and cushion running shoes attenuate shock better than motion-control running shoes.

In a study evaluating the effect of motion-control versus neutral shoes on overpronators, Cheung and Ng used electrical devices to measure muscle activity as subjects ran 10 kilometers. The authors noted that when wearing motion-control shoes, runners who pronated excessively reported reduced muscular fatigue in the front and sides of their legs.

In a separate study of excessive supinators, Wegener, et al., evaluated pressure along the bottom of the foot when high-arched individuals wore either cushion running shoes or motion-control shoes. The authors confirmed that the cushion running shoes more effectively distributed pressure and were perceived as being more comfortable than the motion-control running shoes.

The results of the previously listed studies suggest the practice of choosing running shoes based on arch height has merit, particularly for people on the far ends of the arch height spectrum.

Which Running Shoe? The Most Important Factors to Consider

When you look at all of the research evaluating running shoe prescription and injury, it becomes clear that the most important factors to consider when selecting a running shoe are that it fits the foot perfectly (width, length and shape), and that the midsole is comfortable. The size of the shoe is determined by matching the widest part of the forefoot to the widest part of the toe box, and there should be a few millimeters of space between the tip of the longest toe and the end of the running shoe. The shoe's upper also should comfortably fit the shape of the foot.

An important factor to consider when prescribing a running shoe is that the midsole should also be selected in part by running style: Heel strikers often need additional cushioning beneath the rearfoot, while midfoot strikers typically prefer zero-drop midsoles. In almost all situations, even extremely flat-footed runners should think twice about wearing heavy motion- control running shoes because they may dampen sensory input from the foot and their extreme stiffness often results in ankle and/or knee injuries.

In order to identify the midsole that is right, experiment with a range of running shoes until you find just the right thickness, stiffness and downward slope.

Though rarely discussed, perhaps the most important attributes of a midsole is its overall stiffness. In my experience, the stiffness of a running shoe midsole is the most important factor associated with comfort and injury prevention. You can easily evaluate midsole stiffness by twisting it in several directions while grabbing the heel and forefoot.

There is a surprising amount of variation in midsole stiffness, as running shoes will bend with anywhere from 5-50 pounds of force. The best running shoes will bend with very little pressure, allowing your feet to move freely in all directions.

Unfortunately, manufacturers rarely provide information regarding overall stiffness, and it is important for runners to know the precise degree of midsole stiffness that is most comfortable for them. High-arched runners tend to be drawn to extremely flexible midsoles, while low-arched runners usually prefer a slightly stiffer midsole. The extremely stiff midsoles are almost universally uncomfortable.

The bottom line with all the research on running shoe prescription is that you are always the best judge of which running shoe is right for you. However, keep in mind that heavy motion-control shoes may interfere with proprioception, while minimalist running shoes, such as the "five-finger" running shoes, are too thin to provide adequate protection and have recently been proven to produce very high injury rates. As a general rule, most runners will do best with lightweight stability shoes that match the shape of their feet.

Thomas Michaud, DC, is the author of Injury-Free Running

We thought this was a good article for runners looking for shoes and questions they can ask at the running stores when your buying a new pair of shoes.  If you have any type of running injuries with foot pain, ankle pain, achiile pain and knee pain please feel free to contact Lyn Lake Chiropractic or find a good sports chiropractor

 

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Running Shoe, Which is right for you!

March 26, 2014

Which Type of Running Shoe Is Right for You?

Because runners with different arch heights are prone to different injuries, running shoe manufacturers have developed motion-control, stability and cushion running shoes for low-, neutral- and high-arched runners, respectively.

To control the excessive pronation present in low-arched individuals, motion-control running shoes have added midsole material beneath the center of the arch. On the other side of the spectrum, cushion Quick read more or view full article running shoes are made for runners with high arches and are manufactured with a curve-lasted shape designed to fit the typical high-arched foot.

In order to improve shock absorption, the midsoles in cushion running shoes are significantly softer. To fit runners with neutral feet, stability running shoes are made with semi-curved lasts and only a moderate amount of midsole cushioning.

For more than 30 years, running shoe manufacturers have suggested that prescribing running shoes based on arch height will reduce injury rates and increase comfort. Surprisingly, despite the fact that consumers have spent billions of dollars for just the right running shoe, there is conflicting evidence suggesting the prescription of running shoes based on arch height is clinically justified.

Arch Height, Shoe Type and Injury Rates

In one of the largest studies done to date, Knapik, et al., divided 1,400 male and female Marine Corps recruits into two groups: an experimental group in which running shoe recommendation was based on arch height, and a control group that wore neutral stability running shoes regardless of arch height. After the subjects completed an intensive 12-week training regimen, the authors concluded that prescribing running shoes according to arch height was not necessary, since there was no difference in injury rates between the two groups.

In another study evaluating the value of prescribing running shoes according to arch height, Ryan, et al., categorized 81 female runners as supinators, neutral or pronators, and then randomly assigned them to wear neutral, stability or motion-control running shoes. Again, the authors concluded that there was no correlation between foot type, running shoe use and the frequency of reported pain.

One of the more interesting findings of this research was that the individuals classified as pronators reported greater levels of pain when wearing the motion-control running shoes. This is consistent with the hypothesis that excessive midsole thickness may dampen sensory input, amplifying the potential for injury because the athlete can't "feel the ground."

Supporting the belief that running shoe prescription should continue to be based on arch height, several high-quality laboratory studies have shown that the different types of running shoes actually do what they are supposed to do: Motion-control running shoes have been proven to limit pronation, and cushion running shoes have been proven to improve shock absorption.

To prove this, researchers measured arch height and evaluated impact forces, tibial accelerations, and the range and speed of pronation after high- and low-arched runners were randomly assigned to wear cushion and motion-control running shoes. The detailed analysis confirmed that motion-control running shoes do, in fact, control rearfoot motion better than cushion running shoes; and cushion running shoes attenuate shock better than motion-control running shoes.

In a study evaluating the effect of motion-control versus neutral shoes on overpronators, Cheung and Ng used electrical devices to measure muscle activity as subjects ran 10 kilometers. The authors noted that when wearing motion-control shoes, runners who pronated excessively reported reduced muscular fatigue in the front and sides of their legs.

In a separate study of excessive supinators, Wegener, et al., evaluated pressure along the bottom of the foot when high-arched individuals wore either cushion running shoes or motion-control shoes. The authors confirmed that the cushion running shoes more effectively distributed pressure and were perceived as being more comfortable than the motion-control running shoes.

The results of the previously listed studies suggest the practice of choosing running shoes based on arch height has merit, particularly for people on the far ends of the arch height spectrum.

Which Running Shoe? The Most Important Factors to Consider

When you look at all of the research evaluating running shoe prescription and injury, it becomes clear that the most important factors to consider when selecting a running shoe are that it fits the foot perfectly (width, length and shape), and that the midsole is comfortable. The size of the shoe is determined by matching the widest part of the forefoot to the widest part of the toe box, and there should be a few millimeters of space between the tip of the longest toe and the end of the running shoe. The shoe's upper also should comfortably fit the shape of the foot.

An important factor to consider when prescribing a running shoe is that the midsole should also be selected in part by running style: Heel strikers often need additional cushioning beneath the rearfoot, while midfoot strikers typically prefer zero-drop midsoles. In almost all situations, even extremely flat-footed runners should think twice about wearing heavy motion- control running shoes because they may dampen sensory input from the foot and their extreme stiffness often results in ankle and/or knee injuries.

In order to identify the midsole that is right, experiment with a range of running shoes until you find just the right thickness, stiffness and downward slope.

Though rarely discussed, perhaps the most important attributes of a midsole is its overall stiffness. In my experience, the stiffness of a running shoe midsole is the most important factor associated with comfort and injury prevention. You can easily evaluate midsole stiffness by twisting it in several directions while grabbing the heel and forefoot.

There is a surprising amount of variation in midsole stiffness, as running shoes will bend with anywhere from 5-50 pounds of force. The best running shoes will bend with very little pressure, allowing your feet to move freely in all directions.

Unfortunately, manufacturers rarely provide information regarding overall stiffness, and it is important for runners to know the precise degree of midsole stiffness that is most comfortable for them. High-arched runners tend to be drawn to extremely flexible midsoles, while low-arched runners usually prefer a slightly stiffer midsole. The extremely stiff midsoles are almost universally uncomfortable.

The bottom line with all the research on running shoe prescription is that you are always the best judge of which running shoe is right for you. However, keep in mind that heavy motion-control shoes may interfere with proprioception, while minimalist running shoes, such as the "five-finger" running shoes, are too thin to provide adequate protection and have recently been proven to produce very high injury rates. As a general rule, most runners will do best with lightweight stability shoes that match the shape of their feet.

Thomas Michaud, DC, is the author of Injury-Free Running

We thought this was a good article for runners looking for shoes and questions they can ask at the running stores when your buying a new pair of shoes.  If you have any type of running injuries with foot pain, ankle pain, achiile pain and knee pain please feel free to contact Lyn Lake Chiropractic or find a good sports chiropractor

 

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Active Release Technique - Lyn Lake Chiropractic

May 4, 2013
ART is a patented, state of the art soft tissue system/movement based massage technique that treats problems with muscles, tendons, ligaments, fascia and nerves. Headaches, back pain, carpal tunnel syndrome, shin splints, shoulder pain, sciatica, plantar fasciitis, knee problems, and tennis elbow are just a few of the many conditions that can be resolved quickly and permanently with ART. These conditions all have one important thing in common: they are often a result of overused muscles.
 
How do overuse conditions occur?
Over-used muscles (and other soft tissues) change in three important ways:
  • acute conditions (pulls, tears, collisions, etc),
  • accumulation of small tears (micro-trauma)
  • not getting enough oxygen (hypoxia).
Each of these factors can cause your body to produce tough, dense scar tissue in the affected area. This scar tissue binds up and ties down tissues that need to move freely. As scar tissue builds up, muscles become shorter and weaker, tension on tendons causes tendonitis, Quick read more or view full article and nerves can become trapped. This can cause reduced range of motion, loss of strength, and pain. If a nerve is trapped you may also feel tingling, numbness, and weakness.
 
What is an ART treatment like?
Every ART session is actually a combination of examination and treatment. The ART provider uses his or her hands to evaluate the texture, tightness and movement of muscles, fascia, tendons, ligaments and nerves. Abnormal tissues are treated by combining precisely directed tension with very specific patient movements.
 
These treatment protocols - over 500 specific moves - are unique to ART. They allow providers to identify and correct the specific problems that are affecting each individual patient. ART is not a cookie-cutter approach.

Chiropractor Dr Ryan Jones at Lyn Lake Chiropractic is a Certified Active Release Technique Specialist. Lyn Lake Chiropractic is always trying to offer more treatments that may help their patients.

ART can help with:
Shoulder pain, neck pain, hip pain, back pain and more...
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Posted by Dr Kevin Schreifels

Try LynLake Chiropractic!!!

October 23, 2011

Try LynLake Chiropractic!!!

by PeaceLily03 at Citysearch      10/21/2011

I highly recommend Lyn Lake Chiropractic. I got into an automobile accident in late August. The aftermath of the accident left me with neck pain, lower back pain, and knee pain -  injuries. I have been receiving phenomenal care from the Team at Lyn Lake Chiropractic. They are highly skilled, knowledgeable about the latest in treatment options, and genuinely care about each individuals recovery. It is an upbeat environment. From the moment I called to book an appointment I was impressed with the sincere and friendly service on the other end of the line. Also, after my initial visit I received a hand written thank you card, which really impressed me. Lyn Lake Chiropractic goes the extra mile to making you feel special! Dr. Kevin Schreifels is very personable and has a lot of energy himself. Like I said, it's positive Quick read more or view full article environment, with a lot of positive energy flowing...and that goes to say for the positive healing, too! Try Lyn Lake Chiropractic and I guarantee you will notice the difference!


 

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For Runners, Soft Ground Can Be Hard on the Body

August 24, 2011

For Runners, Soft Ground Can Be Hard on the Body

By Gina Kolata writer for the New York Times.

Hirofumi Tanaka, an exercise physiologist at the University of Texas at Austin, bristles when he sees dirt paths carved out of the grass along paved bicycling or running routes. The paths are created by runners who think softer ground protects them from injuries.

Dr. Tanaka, a runner, once tried it himself. He was recovering from a knee pain, injury and an orthopedist told him to stay away from hard surfaces, like asphalt roads, and run instead on softer surfaces, like grass or dirt. So he ran on a dirt path runners had beaten into the grass along an asphalt bike path.

The result? “I twisted my ankle and aggravated my injury while running on the softer and irregular surface,” he said.

In the aftermath of his accident, Dr. Tanaka said he Quick read more or view full article could not find any scientific evidence that a softer surface is beneficial to runners, nor could other experts he asked. In fact, it makes just as much sense to reason that runners are more likely to get injured on soft surfaces, which often are irregular, than on smooth, hard ones, he said.

His experience makes me wonder. Is there a good reason why many runners think a soft surface is gentler on their feet and limbs? Or is this another example of a frequent error we all make, trusting what seems like common sense and never asking if the conventional wisdom is correct?

Perhaps a runner who, like me, strikes the ground with her forefoot instead of her heel, might risk more injuries on softer ground. After all, every time I push off on a soft surface, I twist my foot.

Exercise researchers say there are no rigorous gold-standard studies in which large numbers of people were assigned to run on soft or hard surfaces, then followed to compare injury rates.

There’s a good reason for that, said Stuart J. Warden, director of the Indiana Center for Translational Musculoskeletal Research at Indiana University. It’s too hard to recruit large numbers of people willing to be randomly assigned to one surface or another for their runs.

“I think the reason people haven’t answered that question is that it is not an easy question to answer,” Dr. Warden said.

When Dr. Willem van Mechelen, head of public and occupational health at VU University Medical Center in Amsterdam, searched for published studies on running injuries and how to prevent them, he, too, concluded that there were no good studies that directly support running on softer ground. “Significantly not associated with running injuries seem age, gender, body mass index, running hills, running on hard surfaces, participation in other sports, time of the year and time of the day,” Dr. van Mechelen concluded.

So what is going on? It seems obvious that the forces on your legs and feet are different depending on whether you run on soft packed dirt or on hard concrete. Why aren’t injury rates affected?

An answer that many accept comes from studies that addressed the question indirectly. In several of them, study subjects ran on plates that measured the force with which they struck the ground. Instead of varying the hardness of the ground, the researchers varied the cushioning of the shoes. More cushioning approximated running on softer ground.

Over and over again, studies like these found that the body automatically adjusts to different surfaces — at least, as mimicked by cushioning in shoes — to keep forces constant when foot strikes plate.

That finding makes sense, Dr. Warden said. If you jump from a table to the floor, you automatically bend your knees when you land. If you jump on a trampoline, you can keep your knees stiff when you land. Something similar happens when you run on different surfaces.

“If you run on a hard surface, your body decreases its stiffness,” Dr. Warden said. “Your knees and hips flex more. On a soft surface, your legs stiffen.” Running on a soft surface “is basically a different activity,” he said.

But those studies did not actually measure forces inside the body, Dr. van Mechelen noted. Instead, they used biomechanical modeling to estimate those forces.

“It is models, so God knows whether it is true,” Dr. van Mechelen said. “But to me it doesn’t seem far-fetched.”

Dr. Warden said some people adapt quicker than others to running surfaces, and he advised that anyone wanting to change from a soft to a hard surface, or vice versa, play it safe and make the change gradually.

Changing your running surface, Dr. Warden said, “is much like increasing your mileage, changing your shoes or some other aspect of your training program.” Abrupt changes can be risky.

But with no evidence that softer surfaces prevent injuries, there is no reason to run on softer ground unless you like to, Dr. Warden and other experts said. Dr. van Mechelen tells runners to get a pair of comfortable shoes and run on whatever surface they prefer.

Dr. van Mechelen, a runner himself, says his favorite surface is asphalt. Mine is too.

My coach, Tom Fleming, never suggested soft surfaces and never thought they prevented injuries. And, he said, there’s a good reason to run on asphalt, at least if you want to compete.

“Most road races are on hard roadways,” he told me. “So let’s get used to them.”

I just thought this article is something to think about since most of the runners training in the twin cities run along the river road or around the chain of lakes in Minneapolis.  As every runner knows, next to all the asphalt running paths there's this dirt path that many runners and walkers have created.  I myself enjoy going back and forth from hard surface to the dirt path on my long runs. In conclusion, I would say, do whatever works for you and most importantly: enjoy the run!

The best advice I can give any runner that is having any type of pain and seeking medical advice.  Take advice from a doctor who owns some running shoes.

Lyn Lake Chiropractic has been the Official Chiropractors of The Twin Cities Marathon for many years.  Runners Treating Runners!

If you have any issues, please call, email or stop by and take the time to talk to one of the doctors that do own a pair of running shoes!

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Running injuries

August 22, 2011
Twin Cities Marathon and Twin Cities 10 miler is only 41 days.  If your training for the great Twin Cities Marathon please take the time to heal between your long runs. Remember when you start having any type of pain, Achilles tendonitis, ITB issues, knee pain, hip pain or foot pain,  please get checked out right away. The quicker you get treated, the quicker you will heal to continue your training for the big day!

We see so many athletes that train so hard for a race and they start having pain they either keep running or ignore the issue until the race get's close.  Then, they come in, take the extra time and get treated right away!  Don't wait!!, Our chiropractors have helped thousands of runners and have the knowledge and expertise in treating running injuries.

Lyn Lake Chiropractic treat runners and have amazing results!

Sports chiropractic is a natural health care...

April 26, 2011
Lyn Lake Chiropractic Specializes in treating Sports Injuries. They work with kids, weekend athletes, high school and college athletes, and pro athletes. Anyone that is active can end up with a sports injury that would benefit from being treated by a sports Minneapolis chiropractic clinic.

Many amateur and professional athletes are sidelined with injuries that could be avoided. Others sit it out on the bench because their injury does not respond to ordinary treatment. Still, others are playing, but at less than peak efficiency, simply because their structural system is not balance. Progressive coaches, athletes, and doctors are realizing that pain killing drugs are not the answer. They merely cover up the symptoms, deceiving the athlete into actions which could make the injury more serious and longer lasting. 

Lyn Lake Chiropractic's approach to health closely relates to the needs of the sports participant. Most sports involve body contact, fast Quick read more or view full article starts and stops, and body positioning that places an unusual amount of strain on the back and structural system. Lyn Lake Chiropractic considers a person as an integrated being, giving special attention to the spine, joints, muscles, tendons, ligaments, and nerves. 

Sports chiropractic is a natural health care method that stresses the importance of keeping all the systems of the body functioning efficiently so the player enjoys peak performance, experiences a minimum injury risk, and has fast recuperative powers. 

Many world class and Olympic athletes, as well as professional stars and teams, have retained sports chiropractors to provide care. Joe Montana, Nolan Ryan, Muhammad Ali, Kareem Abdul-Jubbar, and Carl Lewis all utilize chiropractic care. The Players Association of the NFL has officially incorporated sports chiropractors as a regular part of care. Chiropractors have been selected as attending doctors at the Olympic Games and at national and world championships in track and field, cycling, volleyball, powerlifting, aerobics, and triathlons. Lyn Lake Chiropractic will not only help get you out of pain, but will try to find the cause so your symptoms don't return.

"Lifting weights and seeing a chiropractor on a regular basis has made me a better golfer. I've been going to a chiropractor for as long as I can remember. It's as important to my training as practicing my swing."   – Tiger Woods.

Running injuries, plantar fasciitis, knee pain, and foot pain can be treated with chiropractic.

Shin Splints
This running injury often causes pain along either side of the lower leg. Symptoms vary greatly from dull tightness to a painful area along the lower leg. Injuries have a higher incidence of occurrence in athletes starting a new running or aerobic program. 

Achilles Tendonitis
Inflammation of the tendon that connects the calf muscle to the heel. Can be stiff at the beginning of a run and feel better during the workout. Pain varies from dull ache to acute, knife-like pain. Which can cause pain with Achilles Tendonitis while running or walking.

Stress Fracture
Usually located in either the lower leg (tibia or fibula) or one of the metatarsals (toes), the 2nd and 3rd toes being the most common. This type of running injury can be difficult to diagnose in its early stages and can be confused with shin splints. 

Runners Knee
Knee Pain
Usual symptoms of this running injury include pain directly under the kneecap, or the surrounding area. Climbing or descending stairs may cause knee pain. Usually the runners knee - running injury responds well our minneapolis chiropractor.
Heel Pain - Arch Pain - Plantar Fasciitis

Plantar fasciitis
Foot Pain
Common type of running injury - varies from a slight tightness in the bottom of the foot to an intense heel pain that may worsen when getting out of bed in the morning and then lessen after a few steps. The pain is often reproduced if the toes are dorsiflexed (pulled up). An X-ray will sometimes reveal the running injury, known as plantar fasciitis, (foot pain) as a "heel spur" on the bottom of the heel. This running injury is usually due to an over pronation of the foot and ankle while walking and running. 

With plantar fasciitis, the pain is more severe when running on the balls of the feet. If pain is more intense on heel contact, a condition called Heel Spur Syndrome could be present. Heel Spurs result from excessive ossification (bone formation) due to the constant pulling of the fascia at the point where the fascia inserts on the bottom of the heel, this can be extremely painful. Minneapolis Chiropractors can help with this issue with adjusting your feet, ankle and extremities, massage, ultrasound, laser, taping. Our Lyn Lake Chiropractic Chiropractors would be glad to assess your shoes, running shoes or sport shoes and suggest the proper shoe your body needs to help correct the problem.

Ilio-Tibial Band Syndrome
These running injuries can manifest themselves anywhere along the entire length of this highly fibrous connective tissue running from the top of the hip to just below the knee. At its worst, pain can be very intense at either the outside of the hip to the outside of the knee. A complete biomechanical evaluation, foot to hip, is needed to diagnose the problem and prevent further running injuries. Stretching can aggravate running injuries of this type.

Want to stay up to date on the best tips to avoid running injuries? 
Call Lyn Lake Chiropractic. Read Less

We see a lot of knee injuries

March 16, 2011
We see a lot of knee injuries in chiropractic care, or people who suffer from knee pain. Chiropractic care is sometimes seen as alternative, especially when it comes to knee pain, to orthopaedic care. The chiropractor’s approach to knee pain includes an evaluation for possible spinal or pelvic involvement in addition to local knee dysfunction.

Knee pain can come from many sources like the following and the knee is unguarded and exposed to hostile elements, rendering it open to knee pain:
1. Injuries resulting from impact, running
2. Heavy blows to the knee from outside causes
3. Dashboard related afflictions with car accidents
4. Falls with direct impact

Soft tissue injuries resulting in knee pain are usually the result of either overuse or disuse. Some common presentations to a chiropractor’s office include:
1. Player of sports, runners, cyclist presenting with anterior knee pain. aka: runners knee.
2. Senior person suffering stiffness and knee pain.
3. Quick read more or view full article Young player with ache over the tibial tuberosity.
4. Person complaining of knee instability.

Knee pain treatment modality usually takes on a conservative stance. Most knee pain responds very well to a combination of non-invasive treatments such as chiropractic adjustments, Ultrasound, Laser, massage, applying heat or cold, exercise to strengthen the muscles that support the knee and temporarily restraining from activities that aggravate the knee pain.

To identify the true cause of your knee pain, Lyn Lake Chiropractic will initiate the following pre-treatment processes: take a detailed history, examine you and do neurological and orthopaedic testing and perform radiologic tests. Then a plan of management specifically for your case will be designed by your treating chiropractor.

Spring is here and everyone will be starting to push themselves again getting back into shape. Take it easy and if you have any pain, don't wait until the injury stops your activity or sport. See your chiropractor or call Lyn Lake Chiropractic for a Free Consultation to see if we can help. When in doubt we will refer you to an orthopedic clinic we feel can help you! Read Less

Get in Gear Race Saturday, April 24, 2010

March 28, 2010
Get in Gear
33rd Annual Rite of Spring!

Saturday, April 24, 2010

Lyn Lake Chiropractic is a proud supporter of the 33rd Annual Rite of Spring Get in Gear Race. Being the Official Chiropractors for the Medtronic Twin Cities Marathon we feel this race is the kick off for the running season in Minnesota.

We have seen many runner's already getting ready for the Get in Gear, Boston Marathon and many more races. Runners elite to beginners use the Get in Gear Race as a starting point to determine if they need to train harder and faster for more races to come.

While you're training and racing, remember to keep your body running as efficient as possible with having regular chiropractic care. If start to have any pain or discomfort ie: knee pain, foot Quick read more or view full article pain, achilles pain, shin splints, hip pain or lower back pain - when you start increasing your milage and/or speed workouts, get treated as soon as possible to avoid injuries that could stop you from training or racing this spring or summer.

Patients ask us when do you know if you need medical treatment? Our answer is when you start to have any pain. You shouldn't have any pain while running. Pain is the signal from the body telling you there's something wrong and you need to address this now, not later. Lyn Lake Chiropractic offer Free Consultation, use this consultation so we can help you determine if you need treatment.

Get in Gear is the Largest 10K in Minnesota.
Be apart of this awesome race!
You have many different races to pick from.

Runner Info:

Saturday, April 24, 2010
10K Run, 5K Run/Walk, 2K Fun Run & 1/2 Marathon

Location:

4801 Minnehaha Ave. South, Minneapolis, MN 55417

Start Times:
2K & FFF 2K: 8:00a.m.
10K & Half-Marathon: 9:00a.m.
(Note: Three hour limit. Roads open to public at Noon.)
5K: 9:20a.m.

ONLINE REGISTRATION
       Online Registration deadline 11:59pm, Thursday, April 22, 2010    
 Corporate Online Registration deadline April 16, 2010       
 Fit-For-Fun Online Registration deadline April 16, 2010

If you have any questions please contact Get in Gear

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