Chiropractic Health & Wellness Blog

Lyn Lake Chiropractic

Running Shoe, Which is right for you!

March 26, 2014

Which Type of Running Shoe Is Right for You?

Because runners with different arch heights are prone to different injuries, running shoe manufacturers have developed motion-control, stability and cushion running shoes for low-, neutral- and high-arched runners, respectively.

To control the excessive pronation present in low-arched individuals, motion-control running shoes have added midsole material beneath the center of the arch. On the other side of the spectrum, cushion Quick read more or view full article running shoes are made for runners with high arches and are manufactured with a curve-lasted shape designed to fit the typical high-arched foot.

In order to improve shock absorption, the midsoles in cushion running shoes are significantly softer. To fit runners with neutral feet, stability running shoes are made with semi-curved lasts and only a moderate amount of midsole cushioning.

For more than 30 years, running shoe manufacturers have suggested that prescribing running shoes based on arch height will reduce injury rates and increase comfort. Surprisingly, despite the fact that consumers have spent billions of dollars for just the right running shoe, there is conflicting evidence suggesting the prescription of running shoes based on arch height is clinically justified.

Arch Height, Shoe Type and Injury Rates

In one of the largest studies done to date, Knapik, et al., divided 1,400 male and female Marine Corps recruits into two groups: an experimental group in which running shoe recommendation was based on arch height, and a control group that wore neutral stability running shoes regardless of arch height. After the subjects completed an intensive 12-week training regimen, the authors concluded that prescribing running shoes according to arch height was not necessary, since there was no difference in injury rates between the two groups.

In another study evaluating the value of prescribing running shoes according to arch height, Ryan, et al., categorized 81 female runners as supinators, neutral or pronators, and then randomly assigned them to wear neutral, stability or motion-control running shoes. Again, the authors concluded that there was no correlation between foot type, running shoe use and the frequency of reported pain.

One of the more interesting findings of this research was that the individuals classified as pronators reported greater levels of pain when wearing the motion-control running shoes. This is consistent with the hypothesis that excessive midsole thickness may dampen sensory input, amplifying the potential for injury because the athlete can't "feel the ground."

Supporting the belief that running shoe prescription should continue to be based on arch height, several high-quality laboratory studies have shown that the different types of running shoes actually do what they are supposed to do: Motion-control running shoes have been proven to limit pronation, and cushion running shoes have been proven to improve shock absorption.

To prove this, researchers measured arch height and evaluated impact forces, tibial accelerations, and the range and speed of pronation after high- and low-arched runners were randomly assigned to wear cushion and motion-control running shoes. The detailed analysis confirmed that motion-control running shoes do, in fact, control rearfoot motion better than cushion running shoes; and cushion running shoes attenuate shock better than motion-control running shoes.

In a study evaluating the effect of motion-control versus neutral shoes on overpronators, Cheung and Ng used electrical devices to measure muscle activity as subjects ran 10 kilometers. The authors noted that when wearing motion-control shoes, runners who pronated excessively reported reduced muscular fatigue in the front and sides of their legs.

In a separate study of excessive supinators, Wegener, et al., evaluated pressure along the bottom of the foot when high-arched individuals wore either cushion running shoes or motion-control shoes. The authors confirmed that the cushion running shoes more effectively distributed pressure and were perceived as being more comfortable than the motion-control running shoes.

The results of the previously listed studies suggest the practice of choosing running shoes based on arch height has merit, particularly for people on the far ends of the arch height spectrum.

Which Running Shoe? The Most Important Factors to Consider

When you look at all of the research evaluating running shoe prescription and injury, it becomes clear that the most important factors to consider when selecting a running shoe are that it fits the foot perfectly (width, length and shape), and that the midsole is comfortable. The size of the shoe is determined by matching the widest part of the forefoot to the widest part of the toe box, and there should be a few millimeters of space between the tip of the longest toe and the end of the running shoe. The shoe's upper also should comfortably fit the shape of the foot.

An important factor to consider when prescribing a running shoe is that the midsole should also be selected in part by running style: Heel strikers often need additional cushioning beneath the rearfoot, while midfoot strikers typically prefer zero-drop midsoles. In almost all situations, even extremely flat-footed runners should think twice about wearing heavy motion- control running shoes because they may dampen sensory input from the foot and their extreme stiffness often results in ankle and/or knee injuries.

In order to identify the midsole that is right, experiment with a range of running shoes until you find just the right thickness, stiffness and downward slope.

Though rarely discussed, perhaps the most important attributes of a midsole is its overall stiffness. In my experience, the stiffness of a running shoe midsole is the most important factor associated with comfort and injury prevention. You can easily evaluate midsole stiffness by twisting it in several directions while grabbing the heel and forefoot.

There is a surprising amount of variation in midsole stiffness, as running shoes will bend with anywhere from 5-50 pounds of force. The best running shoes will bend with very little pressure, allowing your feet to move freely in all directions.

Unfortunately, manufacturers rarely provide information regarding overall stiffness, and it is important for runners to know the precise degree of midsole stiffness that is most comfortable for them. High-arched runners tend to be drawn to extremely flexible midsoles, while low-arched runners usually prefer a slightly stiffer midsole. The extremely stiff midsoles are almost universally uncomfortable.

The bottom line with all the research on running shoe prescription is that you are always the best judge of which running shoe is right for you. However, keep in mind that heavy motion-control shoes may interfere with proprioception, while minimalist running shoes, such as the "five-finger" running shoes, are too thin to provide adequate protection and have recently been proven to produce very high injury rates. As a general rule, most runners will do best with lightweight stability shoes that match the shape of their feet.

Thomas Michaud, DC, is the author of Injury-Free Running

We thought this was a good article for runners looking for shoes and questions they can ask at the running stores when your buying a new pair of shoes.  If you have any type of running injuries with foot pain, ankle pain, achiile pain and knee pain please feel free to contact Lyn Lake Chiropractic or find a good sports chiropractor

 

Read Less

Running Shoe, Which is right for you!

March 26, 2014

Which Type of Running Shoe Is Right for You?

Because runners with different arch heights are prone to different injuries, running shoe manufacturers have developed motion-control, stability and cushion running shoes for low-, neutral- and high-arched runners, respectively.

To control the excessive pronation present in low-arched individuals, motion-control running shoes have added midsole material beneath the center of the arch. On the other side of the spectrum, cushion Quick read more or view full article running shoes are made for runners with high arches and are manufactured with a curve-lasted shape designed to fit the typical high-arched foot.

In order to improve shock absorption, the midsoles in cushion running shoes are significantly softer. To fit runners with neutral feet, stability running shoes are made with semi-curved lasts and only a moderate amount of midsole cushioning.

For more than 30 years, running shoe manufacturers have suggested that prescribing running shoes based on arch height will reduce injury rates and increase comfort. Surprisingly, despite the fact that consumers have spent billions of dollars for just the right running shoe, there is conflicting evidence suggesting the prescription of running shoes based on arch height is clinically justified.

Arch Height, Shoe Type and Injury Rates

In one of the largest studies done to date, Knapik, et al., divided 1,400 male and female Marine Corps recruits into two groups: an experimental group in which running shoe recommendation was based on arch height, and a control group that wore neutral stability running shoes regardless of arch height. After the subjects completed an intensive 12-week training regimen, the authors concluded that prescribing running shoes according to arch height was not necessary, since there was no difference in injury rates between the two groups.

In another study evaluating the value of prescribing running shoes according to arch height, Ryan, et al., categorized 81 female runners as supinators, neutral or pronators, and then randomly assigned them to wear neutral, stability or motion-control running shoes. Again, the authors concluded that there was no correlation between foot type, running shoe use and the frequency of reported pain.

One of the more interesting findings of this research was that the individuals classified as pronators reported greater levels of pain when wearing the motion-control running shoes. This is consistent with the hypothesis that excessive midsole thickness may dampen sensory input, amplifying the potential for injury because the athlete can't "feel the ground."

Supporting the belief that running shoe prescription should continue to be based on arch height, several high-quality laboratory studies have shown that the different types of running shoes actually do what they are supposed to do: Motion-control running shoes have been proven to limit pronation, and cushion running shoes have been proven to improve shock absorption.

To prove this, researchers measured arch height and evaluated impact forces, tibial accelerations, and the range and speed of pronation after high- and low-arched runners were randomly assigned to wear cushion and motion-control running shoes. The detailed analysis confirmed that motion-control running shoes do, in fact, control rearfoot motion better than cushion running shoes; and cushion running shoes attenuate shock better than motion-control running shoes.

In a study evaluating the effect of motion-control versus neutral shoes on overpronators, Cheung and Ng used electrical devices to measure muscle activity as subjects ran 10 kilometers. The authors noted that when wearing motion-control shoes, runners who pronated excessively reported reduced muscular fatigue in the front and sides of their legs.

In a separate study of excessive supinators, Wegener, et al., evaluated pressure along the bottom of the foot when high-arched individuals wore either cushion running shoes or motion-control shoes. The authors confirmed that the cushion running shoes more effectively distributed pressure and were perceived as being more comfortable than the motion-control running shoes.

The results of the previously listed studies suggest the practice of choosing running shoes based on arch height has merit, particularly for people on the far ends of the arch height spectrum.

Which Running Shoe? The Most Important Factors to Consider

When you look at all of the research evaluating running shoe prescription and injury, it becomes clear that the most important factors to consider when selecting a running shoe are that it fits the foot perfectly (width, length and shape), and that the midsole is comfortable. The size of the shoe is determined by matching the widest part of the forefoot to the widest part of the toe box, and there should be a few millimeters of space between the tip of the longest toe and the end of the running shoe. The shoe's upper also should comfortably fit the shape of the foot.

An important factor to consider when prescribing a running shoe is that the midsole should also be selected in part by running style: Heel strikers often need additional cushioning beneath the rearfoot, while midfoot strikers typically prefer zero-drop midsoles. In almost all situations, even extremely flat-footed runners should think twice about wearing heavy motion- control running shoes because they may dampen sensory input from the foot and their extreme stiffness often results in ankle and/or knee injuries.

In order to identify the midsole that is right, experiment with a range of running shoes until you find just the right thickness, stiffness and downward slope.

Though rarely discussed, perhaps the most important attributes of a midsole is its overall stiffness. In my experience, the stiffness of a running shoe midsole is the most important factor associated with comfort and injury prevention. You can easily evaluate midsole stiffness by twisting it in several directions while grabbing the heel and forefoot.

There is a surprising amount of variation in midsole stiffness, as running shoes will bend with anywhere from 5-50 pounds of force. The best running shoes will bend with very little pressure, allowing your feet to move freely in all directions.

Unfortunately, manufacturers rarely provide information regarding overall stiffness, and it is important for runners to know the precise degree of midsole stiffness that is most comfortable for them. High-arched runners tend to be drawn to extremely flexible midsoles, while low-arched runners usually prefer a slightly stiffer midsole. The extremely stiff midsoles are almost universally uncomfortable.

The bottom line with all the research on running shoe prescription is that you are always the best judge of which running shoe is right for you. However, keep in mind that heavy motion-control shoes may interfere with proprioception, while minimalist running shoes, such as the "five-finger" running shoes, are too thin to provide adequate protection and have recently been proven to produce very high injury rates. As a general rule, most runners will do best with lightweight stability shoes that match the shape of their feet.

Thomas Michaud, DC, is the author of Injury-Free Running

We thought this was a good article for runners looking for shoes and questions they can ask at the running stores when your buying a new pair of shoes.  If you have any type of running injuries with foot pain, ankle pain, achiile pain and knee pain please feel free to contact Lyn Lake Chiropractic or find a good sports chiropractor

 

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TMJ Chiropractic Care

March 22, 2014

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There are two temporomandibular joints (TMJ), one on each side of the face. They connect the jawbone to the skull and act like sliding hinges to open and close the mouth. They are important in chewing, talking, biting, singing, and making facial expressions.
 

The TMJ complex involves the jawbone, skull, tendons, ligaments, muscles and 2 discs. The discs are like cushions within each joint. The muscles around the TMJ include superficial muscles (close to the surface), and deep muscles (deep within the tissues), and they are collectively called the muscles of mastication.

Problems with the TMJ or the surrounding structures cause temporomandibular dysfunction. This Quick read more or view full article is often referred to as TMJ.

 

Causes

There are many causes of dysfunction. Any problem with the bones, joints, muscles or connective tissues around the joint can cause TMJ. Some of the more common causes include the following:
 

1) Injury- falling, car accidents, fights and any direct trauma to the area can cause damage to the joint and muscles.

2) Disc dislocation- the cushioning disc within the joint itself can become dislodged or stop gliding properly which can cause the joint to stop opening and closing properly.

3) Tight muscles- the muscles that attach the head to the jaw can become tight enough that they pull the jaw to one side when opening and closing the jaw.

4) Stress- stress can cause tension in all the muscles, which can contribute to grinding and clenching the jaw.

5) Weak posture- the muscles that attach to the head and jaw also attach to the neck and shoulders. Stress on postural muscles alters motion in the TMJ.

 

Due to the potential complexity of determining the cause of TMJ symptoms, it is always best to seek treatment with a health care professional familiar with all the different causes of TMJ. Most TMJ is benign and responds well to chiropractic care. The chiropractors at Lyn Lake Chiropractic can help determine the cause of TMJ symptoms, and help you decide if chiropractic care for TMJ might help you.
 

Symptoms

TMJ problems can have many symptoms that can be present all the time, or come and go with motion, chewing, stress levels, or opening and closing the jaw. Some of the common symptoms of TMJ include the following:
 

• Jaw Pain.
• Pain in the face or neck
• Ear pain
• Headaches
• Difficulty chewing
• Inability to open the mouth
• Clicking
• Jaw locking or popping
• Stiffness


 

A health care professional familiar with all the causes of TMJ symptoms can evaluate your condition to determine the cause of symptoms. Once the cause has been determined, most TMJ symptoms will resolve with conservative, non-surgical, treatment.
 

Biomechanical Issues

The TMJ slides, glides and rotates. As the mouth starts to open the jawbone begins to rotate. As the mouth opens more widely the TMJ glides down and forward and continues to rotate slightly. The reverse happens when closing the mouth. There is a soft disc in the middle of the joint that cushions the joint and glides with the bottom part of the joint. Muscles, tendons and ligaments stabilize the TMJ.

There are two joints, one on each side of the face, that are connected by the one jawbone. If muscles on one side of the face are stronger than the other they will pull the jawbone to one side when it is opening and closing. This causes uneven wear and tear on the joints. Any muscle in the body become stronger with use and weaker with disuse- the muscles of mastication follow this same rule. When one side of the jaw is used more than the other side of the jaw, like chewing on one side consistently (especially with gum chewing), the stronger muscles pull tighter and cause the jaw to move unequally.

The disc within the joint can become locked in one place and stop gliding with the jawbone. If this happens it can block the motion of the TMJ so that the mouth cannot open all the way.

The muscles around the jaw connect to the front and back of the neck. Poor posture, with the shoulders rounded and the head forward, causes stress on all the muscles around the neck, including the jaw muscles. This frequently contributes to TMJ pain.

 

Evaluation

While many medical doctors will listen to the symptoms and provide medications that temporarily relieve pain, or refer to a surgeon, chiropractic for TMJ includes a thorough examination of the muscles, ligaments, joints, posture, and gait, as well as discussing past injuries and lifestyle habits that may be contributing to your condition. The chiropractors at Lyn Lake Chiropractic also have specialty training in complex joint and soft tissue problems that may cause TMD. This training gives patients the confidence that their doctor is providing thorough chiropractic TMJ pain relief.
 

Treatment

Most TMJ conditions respond well to conservative treatment like chiropractic, and do not require surgery. Chiropractic care for TMJ generally includes several techniques, each chosen to relieve specific causes of TMJ. At Lyn Lake Chiropractic  incorporates:

Chiropractic adjustments: Gentle, controlled, and directed adjustments delivered to your joints and tissues to restore optimal movement and function.

• Myofascial Release (MFR): TMJ pain can be associated with overly tight and over worked muscles in the jaw, shoulder, neck and upper back. MFR works with the muscles and the soft tissues between the muscles to relax them and optimize their function. Similar to massage, MFR is a more focused and deep treatment of the soft tissues to relieve pain and restore movement.

Active Release Technique (ART): This is a very targeted treatment of specific regions in the muscles and other soft tissues to release scar tissue, and impure muscle function.

If you have any question please feel free to call 
Lyn Lake Chiropractic or call your local chiropractor.

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Kids injured in sledding accidents

March 13, 2014
23,000 kids injured in sledding accidents, doctors urge parents to make children wear helmets Lyn Lake Chiropractic and Dr Kevin Schreifels would like to share these articles to help protect you and your children. I live next to a park that has a big sledding hill and everyday we see a few injuries from this hill. I’m amazed that 80% of the children sledding don’t wear helmets. If you look at the hockey rink you’ll see every young person wearing a helmet. If you or your children are flying down a hill somewhat in control, down! Why not put a helmet on them?!!

You can use a hockey helmet, ski helmet or a bike helmet. Something to protect their little head incase something goes wrong. My children love wearing their helmets, they feel safer plus the helmet keeps their head warm. Here’s a couple articles from the web: Quick read more or view full article Sledding season - experts are cautioning parents to take safety precautions more seriously. A study published earlier this year showed that every kid's favorite snow day tradition could be more dangerous than parents in the past thought. In the study, published in the journal Pediatrics in September, researchers found that 230,000 sledding-related injuries were reported by emergency rooms from 1997-2007. Analysis of the data showed that children 10 to 14 sustained 42.5% of injuries, and boys were almost 10% more likely to sustain injuries than girls.

The findings, which showed that the most frequent injuries were fractures and other injuries to the head, gave doctors more reason to push safer sledding practices. Lara McKenzie, who led the study at Center on Injury Research and Policy at Nationwide Children's Hospital, told MNSBC the information gives pediatricians more reason to strongly encourage parents to require their kids to wear helmets before hitting the mini-slopes. ""I want them to go sledding, I want them to have fun, but we could do a better job,"" McKenzie said. ""Twenty thousand injuries a year for an activity you can only do a couple days a year is big."" The study recommended that parents should discourage their kids from using sledding prospects such as snow tubes that may reduce visibility. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons recommended that while sledding, kids should use common sense: avoid public streets, sit in a forward-facing position, and never sled headfirst. They also advised against the cheapest version of a sled embraced by many college kids especially: plastic sheets.

Across the board though, doctors stress the importance of wearing a helmet to avoid major injuries. And that's a lesson learned the hard way for parents across the country, including Ron Miller and his wife Holly Wastler-Miller, who lost their 12-year-old son, Ian, in a sledding accident. They are trying to get a law passed to require kids younger than 16 to wear helmets when they go sledding in public snow parks. ""Had Ian been wearing a helmet, he would be alive today,"" One more! Statistics from the U.S. Census Bureau were used to calculate injury estimates. Researchers say research is needed to determine whether helmets would reduce injury rates. They also examined the types of sledding vehicles involved in injuries, from sleds and snow tubes to toboggans and snow disks. Among other findings: * Children aged 9 and older were more likely to be injured through collisions. * Children aged 4 and younger were more likely to be involved in accidents with vehicles. * One third of injuries were caused by young people being pulled by motorized vehicles. What the!!!

The use of sleds that can rotate, such as disks and snow tubes, should be discouraged. Younger children should be supervised by parents when sledding. From WebMD.com If you have any questions please feel free to contact us at Lyn Lake Chiropractic. Just because your head is protected, don’t forget your spine takes a beating, and getting adjusted on a regular basis would be another way to protect you and your children! Stay healthy and call your chiropractor! After sledding my 5 yr old came to me and said she felt her neck and back was twisted and she felt sore! I asked her what would she like me to do, she asked me to adjust her spine to put her bones back in place so she doesn't feel twisted. I thought to myself, now that would be another reason to remind parents kids need to be adjusted too!!! Read Less

The Olympics and Chiropractic

March 11, 2014

Well, the Olympics are over once again. We'll have to wait another 4 years to see all the new skills that the winter athletes have perfected. One of the things that I found interesting was the fact that chiropractic care was a part of this years Olympic games.

Of course, this isn't new. Chiropractors have been working hand in hand with athletes for many years. With the intense training and inevitable injuries that athletes have to overcome, it's really not surprising that Quick read more or view full article they would turn to chiropractic care.

Dealing with injuries properly and promptly is the best way to make sure an athlete stays at the top of their sport for as long as possible.

Athletes understand the importance of avoiding drugs and realize that dealing with the underlying problem is the only real way to ensure it is fully healed and can't have an adverse affect on their overall performance.

Chiropractic can not only help heal injuries, it can also be helpful in preventing them. By improving posture, range of motion, flexibility and increase blood flow chiropractic can help the athletes get more out of their game while also avoiding injuries.

You don't have to be a world class athlete to benefit from chiropractic edina and I can do more than help you if you are injured. I can also help you keep your body in alignment which can greatly reduce the instances of injury in the first place.

Want to get more out of your game... or just your life? Come to Lyn Lake Chiropractic. Together we'll find the right treatments to get you back to the top of your game...or just make sure you stay there! Read Less

Are You Just Masking Your Pain?

March 11, 2014
Your body is an amazing machine. It can not only let you know when something is wrong, it can also, in many cases, fix itself with little to no additional help. Pain is the primary method your body uses to let you know something is wrong. The vast majority of pain you feel is mechanical in nature which means there is a dysfunction in your joints, muscles and other soft tissue.

If you deal with this pain and find and correct the underlying problem, you may be able to get rid of the underlying problem once and Quick read more or view full article for all instead of just temporarily masking the pain and continue to suffer. When you feel pain what do you do first? Reach for a bottle of over the counter pain medication? Many people do, and while that's not a bad thing in and of itself, you must remember that pain medications only cover up or mask the feelings of pain. They do nothing to fix the underlying problem.

If you've got joint dysfunction and your body is trying to tell you something is wrong by sending you pain signals but if you're taking medications to block the pain, what do you think will happen? Yep, you will continue with your normal day to day activities and that joint dysfunction will grow worse and spread to other soft tissue causing even more damage. Common problem we see is when runners have foot pain, they just ignore the pain until it gets so bad they can't even walk!  Take the time to address the problem and get treated.

When you have dysfunction in a joint it can also affect the soft connective tissue. When a joint isn't working the way it should the muscles around it can also become stretched and damaged. When the brain realizes that a joint isn't working properly it will send signals to the surrounding soft tissue to allow them to compensate for the injured joint -- which puts more stress on other muscles and soft tissue.

As you can see, all of this can cascade out of control very quickly.

This is why it is so important to never just mask pain when you feel it. Always find the cause of the pain and try to fix it. It's like if you have a rock in your shoe, if you take the time to fix the problem you'll be able to keep running painfree.

Check out some running injuries we treat on our web page. Running Injuries.


Whenever you or someone in your family has any kind of pain, Call Lyn Lake Chiropractic. Together we will find the right solution for your unique issues and try to resolve the underlying dysfunction before it causes more pain and injury.

Lyn Lake Chiropractic will help you actually get better and not just mask the pain so you feel better!  We provide chiropractic care for Minneapolis MN, St. Louis Park MN, Edina MN, Richfeild MN and more. Read Less

Reviews - Lyn Lake Chiropractic 2014

March 5, 2014

Reviews - Lyn Lake Chiropractic 2014

  •  

    100
    Quick read more or view full article addthis:title="Review at yelp" addthis:url="http://www.yelp.com/biz/lyn-lake-chiropractic-minneapolis#hrid:lIVEiAQ1NJjJCeV4AtcX6A" class="addthis_toolbox" style="position: absolute; top: 0px; right: 0px; cursor: pointer; border: none !important; background-color: transparent !important; padding: 0px !important;">More Sharing ServicesShare on facebookShare on twitter
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    Dr. Kevin is one awesome dude. My first visit was a walk in and he adjusted 45 minutes after he closed. Very professional, very knowledgable, definitely knows his stuff. He snapped my body around and made me feel awesome. He's very approachable, and easy to talk to . I will definitely be back there! Lyn Lake Chiropractic
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