Chiropractic Health & Wellness Blog

Lyn Lake Chiropractic

Dr Kevin Schreifels is part of the first group of Advocates.

June 17, 2014
We are proud to announce that Dr. Kevin Schreifels Chiropractor at Lyn Lake Chiropractic has been chosen to serve as a Social Advocate for the American Red Cross! This is a new initiative with the Red Cross and Dr Kevin Schreifels is part of the first group of Advocates

Dr Kevin Schreifels a Minneapolis Chiropractor at  Lyn Quick read more or view full article Lake Chiropractic will be promoting and talking about all the great things the #RedCrossdoes for our community and will attend the American Red Cross Northern Minnesota Region #HeroBreakfast  to share the amazing stories of local #Minnesota Heroes!

Follow the hashtag #MNHeroes14 to learn more on all social channels!

Minneapolis Chiropractic Clinic, 55408

More Info: 

 

Dr. Kevin Schreifels is the Owner of Lyn Lake Chiropractic, the Official Chiropractor for the Medtronic Twin Cities Marathon, Clinical Faculty of Northwestern Health Science University, Guest Lecturer at the University of Minnesota on running injuries and prevention, and Blogger on health issues and prevention.

Kevin has run more than 10 marathons, 10K’s and triathalons, and has raced with the Kenwood Cycling Team. His first date with his wife was a run around Lake Harriet. He’s a father of 3 beautiful girls and everyone that knows his family knows that on any given day or weekend they are all either running around the lakes, biking or skiing. Kevin spends a great deal of volunteering at local schools, running clubs and businesses educating people about health and awareness.

Follow Kevin on Twitter: @lynlakechiros

Like Kevin on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LynLakeChiros

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Sports chiropractor for a running injury?

February 1, 2014

The cycle of many running injuries goes something like this: After admitting that the pain was more than just soreness, you listened to your orthopedic surgeon talk about options ranging from surgery to rehabilitation. You spent months in physical therapy trying to rebuild strength and repair soft tissue damage, eventually hitting a plateau, only to wonder if you'll ever go out for a run again. Avoid Running injuries be pro-active in your care.

The desire to get back out to run is why many runners seek alternative rehabilitation plans that include seeing a sports chiropractor for targeted treatments for their injuries. In my case, after two months in physical therapy, my pain was shifting from my hip to Quick read more or view full article my iliotibial band and psoas muscle, and I knew that it was time to try something new if I ever wanted to run again (or even sit for any length of time).

Why see a sports chiropractor for a running injury?

Although physical therapy is often the first line of defense in rehabbing a running injury, many athletes and runners have started to rely on sports medicine-trained chiropractors. While physical therapy can focus on strengthening and coordination, chiropractic care is designed to improve joint mobilization, making sure that all the joints in the body are moving correctly. Sports chiropractic care has evolved to incorporate the best of both worlds of joint mobilization techniques and soft tissue repair, creating a new gold standard of best practices in treatment plans for patients.

Lyn Lake Chiropractic emphasizes that not only do all the joints in the body need to move correctly, but they also need to move in coordination with the soft tissue – a healthy body is one where all the factors are working well together. Runners who decide to visit a sports chiropractor should expect, according to Lyn Lake Chiropractic a thorough evaluation of bio-mechanics by their chiropractor, including:

• How they are moving.

• How they are standing.

• What the arch of the foot looks like.

• How the knees are aligned.

• How the hips are aligned.

Once an evaluation is completed, sports chiropractors will create the "recipe for the treatment stew" – taking into account the needs of each specific patient to decide between a variety of techniques, each designed to help the body regenerate healthy cells to "activate healing mechanisms."

Four types of chiropractic treatment for running injuries 

1. Active Release Technique (ART) is a combination of massage and stretching where trained chiropractors apply deep tension while they move a joint through a range of motion. ART is used primarily for adhesions deep in the muscle.

2. Graston Technique is a therapy best used for surface level scar tissue that uses handheld stainless steel tools to break down scar tissue-releasing adhesions.

3. Functional dry needling ( aka: Deep Tissue Massage ) is used for very deep trigger points to release tension in the muscles through deep muscle stimulation provided by the needles. Dry needling can be helpful for injuries involving the psoas muscle, which is a critical hip flexor muscle for runners.

4. Electrical muscle stimulation (EMS) stimulates surface muscles to contract releasing tension as a complement to other techniques.

Active Release Technique for runners 

After three months of not being able to run, in almost constant pain ranging from my iliotibial band to the back of my hip and then into my psoas muscle, I was admittedly ready for anything when my orthopedist suggested trying Active Release Technique. According our chiropractor, the reason that Active Release Technique can be beneficial – especially for iliotibial band and hip injuries – is that it combines different muscle work that breaks down scar tissue while also emphasizing correct flexibility. Through Active Release, as our chiropractor explains, you can actually "elongate some of the muscle fibers making those muscles more pliable and therefore healthier."

Anyone preparing for ART should know that this is not a particularly gentle treatment. I tried telling myself that it would be like a deep tissue massage, which I enjoy, although I quickly learned that while highly effective (after three weeks my pain, though still there, was incrementally improving), the pressure and work on the muscles is deep and sometimes painful.

How to stay healthy for the long term

Staying healthy is a constant concern for professional athletes who get constant care from stretching to active release to heat or ice. Most adults or mature athletes, on the other hand, do not make the time every day to use a foam roller, apply ice or heat or keep up with stretching. Runners who have overcome an injury should consider ongoing preventive care, ranging from every two weeks to every six weeks to maintain progress and reduce future injuries.

Spring is coming soon, so when you start your spring training don’t forget to keep Lyn Lake Chiropractic the Official Chiropractor Of The Twin Cities Marathon on your speed dial.  Call if you have any questions or need some quick TLC to keep you running.

chiropractic minneapols 55408

 
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Sports chiropractor for a running injury?

February 1, 2014

The cycle of many running injuries goes something like this: After admitting that the pain was more than just soreness, you listened to your orthopedic surgeon talk about options ranging from surgery to rehabilitation. You spent months in physical therapy trying to rebuild strength and repair soft tissue damage, eventually hitting a plateau, only to wonder if you'll ever go out for a run again. Avoid Running injuries be pro-active in your care.

The desire to get back out to run is why many runners seek alternative rehabilitation plans that include seeing a sports chiropractor for targeted treatments for their injuries. In my case, after two months in physical therapy, my pain was shifting from my hip to Quick read more or view full article my iliotibial band and psoas muscle, and I knew that it was time to try something new if I ever wanted to run again (or even sit for any length of time).

Why see a sports chiropractor for a running injury?

Although physical therapy is often the first line of defense in rehabbing a running injury, many athletes and runners have started to rely on sports medicine-trained chiropractors. While physical therapy can focus on strengthening and coordination, chiropractic care is designed to improve joint mobilization, making sure that all the joints in the body are moving correctly. Sports chiropractic care has evolved to incorporate the best of both worlds of joint mobilization techniques and soft tissue repair, creating a new gold standard of best practices in treatment plans for patients.

Lyn Lake Chiropractic emphasizes that not only do all the joints in the body need to move correctly, but they also need to move in coordination with the soft tissue – a healthy body is one where all the factors are working well together. Runners who decide to visit a sports chiropractor should expect, according to Lyn Lake Chiropractic a thorough evaluation of bio-mechanics by their chiropractor, including:

• How they are moving.

• How they are standing.

• What the arch of the foot looks like.

• How the knees are aligned.

• How the hips are aligned.

Once an evaluation is completed, sports chiropractors will create the "recipe for the treatment stew" – taking into account the needs of each specific patient to decide between a variety of techniques, each designed to help the body regenerate healthy cells to "activate healing mechanisms."

Four types of chiropractic treatment for running injuries 

1. Active Release Technique (ART) is a combination of massage and stretching where trained chiropractors apply deep tension while they move a joint through a range of motion. ART is used primarily for adhesions deep in the muscle.

2. Graston Technique is a therapy best used for surface level scar tissue that uses handheld stainless steel tools to break down scar tissue-releasing adhesions.

3. Functional dry needling ( aka: Deep Tissue Massage ) is used for very deep trigger points to release tension in the muscles through deep muscle stimulation provided by the needles. Dry needling can be helpful for injuries involving the psoas muscle, which is a critical hip flexor muscle for runners.

4. Electrical muscle stimulation (EMS) stimulates surface muscles to contract releasing tension as a complement to other techniques.

Active Release Technique for runners 

After three months of not being able to run, in almost constant pain ranging from my iliotibial band to the back of my hip and then into my psoas muscle, I was admittedly ready for anything when my orthopedist suggested trying Active Release Technique. According our chiropractor, the reason that Active Release Technique can be beneficial – especially for iliotibial band and hip injuries – is that it combines different muscle work that breaks down scar tissue while also emphasizing correct flexibility. Through Active Release, as our chiropractor explains, you can actually "elongate some of the muscle fibers making those muscles more pliable and therefore healthier."

Anyone preparing for ART should know that this is not a particularly gentle treatment. I tried telling myself that it would be like a deep tissue massage, which I enjoy, although I quickly learned that while highly effective (after three weeks my pain, though still there, was incrementally improving), the pressure and work on the muscles is deep and sometimes painful.

How to stay healthy for the long term

Staying healthy is a constant concern for professional athletes who get constant care from stretching to active release to heat or ice. Most adults or mature athletes, on the other hand, do not make the time every day to use a foam roller, apply ice or heat or keep up with stretching. Runners who have overcome an injury should consider ongoing preventive care, ranging from every two weeks to every six weeks to maintain progress and reduce future injuries.

Spring is coming soon, so when you start your spring training don’t forget to keep Lyn Lake Chiropractic the Official Chiropractor Of The Twin Cities Marathon on your speed dial.  Call if you have any questions or need some quick TLC to keep you running.

chiropractic minneapols 55408

 
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Fun Running Facts!

September 21, 2011
Since the Medtronics Twin Cities Marathon is only 11 days away, and with the expo starting in 9 days.  We thought some fun trivia information would be cool to post!  We've found these postings throughout the website!  Enjoy!

Why do I get side stitches?
That pain that rips through your midsection, usually on the right side? Chalk it up to the act of breathing. Or, more accurately, to your diaphragm, the muscle that controls your breathing motion. "It attaches to the liver on the right side," says Dr. Wyrick. "When you run, the attaching ligaments stretch, which stresses the diaphragm and causes pain."

Running Rx Slow down or walk so you can take deep, full breaths. Grabbing your right side and squeezing it to support the liver may also end the pain. Another option: When your left foot hits the ground, exhale, which causes your diaphragm to rise; Quick read more or view full article inhale on your right foot, and it falls down, which decreases the stretching. Finally, keep training. Side stitches typically happen to beginners. "Over time, the ligaments become conditioned to the stress," says Dr. Wyrick.

Why do my toenails go black?
For regular runners, a black toenail is not a matter of if, it's when," says Dr. Bright. Three causes of the black badge: a too-short shoe; a toenail that comes into contact with the roof of the shoe too often; and a runner who uses his toes to grip too hard. However it happens, the result is the same. Blood vessels under the nail break open, which spill blood (which looks black under the opaque nail) into the area between the toe bed and the toenail. "That area isn't accommodating to blood collection: It's rigid and restrictive," says Dr. Bright. "It builds up a lot of pressure quickly."

Running Rx If the pressure is bothering you and you can handle more hurt, press the end of a paper clip or safety pin, heated with a match, through the nail. "That's a pretty painful proposition," says Dr. Bright, who recommends the gentler touch of a doctor. Do it sooner, while the blood is still fluid. If the pain decreases and doesn't bother you, no need to take action. Either way, the skin below it will heal, the nail will die and fall off. Don't worry, it'll grow back someday.

Why am I so sore after a marathon, when I've done 22-mile training runs?
Did you do your training runs with crowds yelling at you and competitors around you unconsciously prompting you to run faster? Thought not. Whether you're a 2:30 or a 5:30 marathoner, your race-day pace tends to be at least a smidge—and possibly lots—faster than training days. That's the difference, says Dr. Bright, between being pleasantly and painfully sore. "You accumulate lactic acid in your muscles by pushing the pace, which brings on premature fatigue," says Dr. Bright. "Plus, the extra mileage—very few people do a 26-mile training run—causes more micro tears in your muscles, and it's likely your muscles haven't totally healed from your training. Race day, they get even more beat up." The combination nets marathonitis, an acute condition that demands stairs be taken backward and the size of a stride be cut in half.

Running Rx A huge fan of ice baths, Dr. Bright recommends the anti-inflammatory plunge, postrace, for at least five to 10 minutes. Don't bother taking NSAIDs like ibuprofen. "The newer studies show they really don't do that much for inflammation," says Dr. Bright. "And they can potentially put your kidneys at risk."

Why does coffee speed up more than just my legs?
A pre-run prereq for many runners to clear the system on their own terms, java stimulates the muscles in the GI tract faster than Mother Nature; some reports say coffee jolts your system in as little as four minutes. Once you're out on the road, proceed with caution: Many energy gels have caffeine in them, which may cause your intestines to move as quickly as your legs.

Running Rx In the weeks before an important run or race, determine how much coffee you need for an evac, then sip and lighten your load accordingly. Also, figure out if you can tolerate caffeinated gels. Plan B: Pick a route with a few public restrooms along the way, so you can properly do your business.


Why does the inside of one ankle get bloody from being hit by the opposite heel, but not the other?
That red tattoo is called a heel whip, and it's from excessive rotational motion of your foot. Instead of your foot traveling in a forward plane, it makes an arc, causing your heel to nick your anklebone. It doesn't have to be gory: Heel whips can also just dirty your inside shin. "The extra torsion can be caused by anything from the alignment in your ankle to a hip issue," says Dicharry, who adds that one side usually bears the bloody brunt because of muscular imbalances.

Running Rx Think about pushing off through the big toe, not the pinky toe, so that your foot swings cleanly forward, and you'll whip your ankle less. If you need more than just a Band-Aid after a run (e.g., ice packs and Advil for various parts of your lower body), a visit to a physical therapist will help you determine whether you have strength imbalances that can be corrected with single-leg exercises.

Why does my GI tract act up when I'm running?
Some people get headaches when they're stressed. Runners get the trots. A 2008 study on 1,281 Dutch runners found that at least 45 percent complained of some gastro-related issue during the run. "The GI tract is very sensitive to stress, and running—or the anticipation before a race—is definitely stressful," says Darrin Bright, M.D., family physician and sports medicine specialist in Columbus, Ohio.

When you run, your intestines take a double hit: The motion jostles their contents and speeds things along. Plus, blood, essential for your tract to stay on track, is rerouted to vital organs and muscles in your lower half, disrupting the sensitive balance your body has for fluid absorption and possibly causing dehydration, which can lead to cramps that force you to beeline for the bathroom.

Running Rx Dr. Bright recommends putting the ix-nay on bathroom-inducing high-fiber and high-fat foods 24 hours before a race or long run, and fueling up on benign, already-tested, plain meals.


If you have any questions, thoughts please feel free to contact us.  Lyn Lake Chiropractic will be at the Twin Cities Marathon Expo on Friday and Saturday.  Stop by the booth and say hi, remember to wear your Lyn Lake Chiropractic Running Shirt!

If you have any Running Injuries please check out our website for more information.http://www.lynlakechiropractic.com/page.cfm?pageid=14893
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Medtronic Twin Cities Marathon Field One-Half Full

March 12, 2011
Media Alert (March 10, 2011)
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Medtronic Twin Cities Marathon Field One-Half Full


What:
A little over a month after registration for the 30th running of the Medtronic Twin Cities Marathon opened, the marathon field approaches 5600 registered runners.

Who:
Runners from across the country and around the world

Where:
Online at www.tcmevents.org

When:
Registration opened February 2, 2011 and will close when the field reaches 11,200
(Medtronic Twin Cities Marathon takes place on October 2)

Twin Cities In Motion, (formerly Twin Cities Marathon, Inc.) is the non-profit organization that organizes running events throughout the year, including the Valentine’s Day TC 5K, 100% Irish For A Day TC 5K & TC 10 Mile, Medtronic TC 1 Mile, Red, White & Boom! TC Half Marathon, Twins Territory 4K, TC 5K, TC 10K & Medtronic TC Family Events, Medtronic TC 10 Mile, Medtronic Twin Cities Marathon, and the Medtronic TC Kids Quick read more or view full article Marathon program and related events, as a community service for the Minneapolis/St. Paul area. Visit tcmevents.org for more information.


Media contact:
Marlene Wright, Marketing & Media Director
Twin Cities In Motion
Office: 651-289-7704
Mobile: 651-755-5206
marlene@tcmevents.org

if you have any questions please feel free to contact Lyn Lake Chiropractic The Official Chiropractors of The Medtronic Twin Cities Marathon.

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Twin Cities Marathon - Lyn Lake Chiropractic

September 30, 2010
Stop by Lyn Lake Chiropractic's booth this weekend at the Health & Expo. We'll have our doctors working the expo. We'll be providing massage and Kinesio - Taping for any athlete that needs a little support to help you get to the finish line.

We have professional photographer at the marathon taking pictures of anyone wearing our Lyn Lake Chiropractic shirts. Checkout our website next week, or stop by the clinic for more photo's of your race!

Lyn Lake Chiropractic is the Official Chiropractors of the Medtronic Twin Cities Marathon. Runners treating Runners!!!

Health & Fitness Expo - October 1 - 2, 2010


HEALTH & FITNESS EXPO
Friday, October 1 12:00 - 8:00 p.m. and
Saturday, October 2 10 a.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Saint Paul RiverCentre, 175 West Kellogg Boulevard, St. Paul

Along with race number and packet pick-up, you’ll find hands-on health and fitness exhibits, great bargains on running and fitness gear, Quick read more or view full article free sampling, free massages, information on equipment, nutrition and other races. Medtronic Twin Cities Marathon merchandise will be available for sale including posters, kids’ and adults’ apparel, novelty items, and more. The Health & Fitness Expo is free and open to the public. Read Less

Boston Marathon - Good Luck!

April 14, 2010
Good Luck to all our patients running Boston Marathon Monday April 19th, 2010.

We'll be thinking of you when your hitting your PR's in Boston. Send us pictures of you wearing our Lyn Lake Chiropractic running shirts so we can post you in our blogs and on our website.

Thank you for letting us be apart of your training and allowing us to provide you the best chiropractic care. Have fun....

Get in Gear Race Saturday, April 24, 2010

March 28, 2010
Get in Gear
33rd Annual Rite of Spring!

Saturday, April 24, 2010

Lyn Lake Chiropractic is a proud supporter of the 33rd Annual Rite of Spring Get in Gear Race. Being the Official Chiropractors for the Medtronic Twin Cities Marathon we feel this race is the kick off for the running season in Minnesota.

We have seen many runner's already getting ready for the Get in Gear, Boston Marathon and many more races. Runners elite to beginners use the Get in Gear Race as a starting point to determine if they need to train harder and faster for more races to come.

While you're training and racing, remember to keep your body running as efficient as possible with having regular chiropractic care. If start to have any pain or discomfort ie: knee pain, foot Quick read more or view full article pain, achilles pain, shin splints, hip pain or lower back pain - when you start increasing your milage and/or speed workouts, get treated as soon as possible to avoid injuries that could stop you from training or racing this spring or summer.

Patients ask us when do you know if you need medical treatment? Our answer is when you start to have any pain. You shouldn't have any pain while running. Pain is the signal from the body telling you there's something wrong and you need to address this now, not later. Lyn Lake Chiropractic offer Free Consultation, use this consultation so we can help you determine if you need treatment.

Get in Gear is the Largest 10K in Minnesota.
Be apart of this awesome race!
You have many different races to pick from.

Runner Info:

Saturday, April 24, 2010
10K Run, 5K Run/Walk, 2K Fun Run & 1/2 Marathon

Location:

4801 Minnehaha Ave. South, Minneapolis, MN 55417

Start Times:
2K & FFF 2K: 8:00a.m.
10K & Half-Marathon: 9:00a.m.
(Note: Three hour limit. Roads open to public at Noon.)
5K: 9:20a.m.

ONLINE REGISTRATION
       Online Registration deadline 11:59pm, Thursday, April 22, 2010    
 Corporate Online Registration deadline April 16, 2010       
 Fit-For-Fun Online Registration deadline April 16, 2010

If you have any questions please contact Get in Gear

www.getingear10K.com Read Less

Dr Jill Field Good Luck in Chicago!

October 10, 2009
We would like to yell out to Dr Jill Field and everyone running the Chicago Marathon on Sunday.

Dr Jill Field Chiropractor at Lyn Lake Chiropractic will be running a sub 3 hour marathon. I'm guessing she will do the 26.2 miles in 2:54. Have a great race Dr. Jill.


Lyn Lake Chiropractic Team...
  • Medtronic Twin Cities Marathon Sponsor
  • Active Release Technologies
  • Rock Tape - Minnesota Chiropractor
  • Better Business Bureau - Minneapolis
  • Yelp - Minneapolis Chiropractor
  • Bizvotes - Minneapolis Chiropractor