Chiropractic Health & Wellness Blog

Lyn Lake Chiropractic

Running Shoe, Which is right for you!

March 26, 2014

Which Type of Running Shoe Is Right for You?

Because runners with different arch heights are prone to different injuries, running shoe manufacturers have developed motion-control, stability and cushion running shoes for low-, neutral- and high-arched runners, respectively.

To control the excessive pronation present in low-arched individuals, motion-control running shoes have added midsole material beneath the center of the arch. On the other side of the spectrum, cushion Quick read more or view full article running shoes are made for runners with high arches and are manufactured with a curve-lasted shape designed to fit the typical high-arched foot.

In order to improve shock absorption, the midsoles in cushion running shoes are significantly softer. To fit runners with neutral feet, stability running shoes are made with semi-curved lasts and only a moderate amount of midsole cushioning.

For more than 30 years, running shoe manufacturers have suggested that prescribing running shoes based on arch height will reduce injury rates and increase comfort. Surprisingly, despite the fact that consumers have spent billions of dollars for just the right running shoe, there is conflicting evidence suggesting the prescription of running shoes based on arch height is clinically justified.

Arch Height, Shoe Type and Injury Rates

In one of the largest studies done to date, Knapik, et al., divided 1,400 male and female Marine Corps recruits into two groups: an experimental group in which running shoe recommendation was based on arch height, and a control group that wore neutral stability running shoes regardless of arch height. After the subjects completed an intensive 12-week training regimen, the authors concluded that prescribing running shoes according to arch height was not necessary, since there was no difference in injury rates between the two groups.

In another study evaluating the value of prescribing running shoes according to arch height, Ryan, et al., categorized 81 female runners as supinators, neutral or pronators, and then randomly assigned them to wear neutral, stability or motion-control running shoes. Again, the authors concluded that there was no correlation between foot type, running shoe use and the frequency of reported pain.

One of the more interesting findings of this research was that the individuals classified as pronators reported greater levels of pain when wearing the motion-control running shoes. This is consistent with the hypothesis that excessive midsole thickness may dampen sensory input, amplifying the potential for injury because the athlete can't "feel the ground."

Supporting the belief that running shoe prescription should continue to be based on arch height, several high-quality laboratory studies have shown that the different types of running shoes actually do what they are supposed to do: Motion-control running shoes have been proven to limit pronation, and cushion running shoes have been proven to improve shock absorption.

To prove this, researchers measured arch height and evaluated impact forces, tibial accelerations, and the range and speed of pronation after high- and low-arched runners were randomly assigned to wear cushion and motion-control running shoes. The detailed analysis confirmed that motion-control running shoes do, in fact, control rearfoot motion better than cushion running shoes; and cushion running shoes attenuate shock better than motion-control running shoes.

In a study evaluating the effect of motion-control versus neutral shoes on overpronators, Cheung and Ng used electrical devices to measure muscle activity as subjects ran 10 kilometers. The authors noted that when wearing motion-control shoes, runners who pronated excessively reported reduced muscular fatigue in the front and sides of their legs.

In a separate study of excessive supinators, Wegener, et al., evaluated pressure along the bottom of the foot when high-arched individuals wore either cushion running shoes or motion-control shoes. The authors confirmed that the cushion running shoes more effectively distributed pressure and were perceived as being more comfortable than the motion-control running shoes.

The results of the previously listed studies suggest the practice of choosing running shoes based on arch height has merit, particularly for people on the far ends of the arch height spectrum.

Which Running Shoe? The Most Important Factors to Consider

When you look at all of the research evaluating running shoe prescription and injury, it becomes clear that the most important factors to consider when selecting a running shoe are that it fits the foot perfectly (width, length and shape), and that the midsole is comfortable. The size of the shoe is determined by matching the widest part of the forefoot to the widest part of the toe box, and there should be a few millimeters of space between the tip of the longest toe and the end of the running shoe. The shoe's upper also should comfortably fit the shape of the foot.

An important factor to consider when prescribing a running shoe is that the midsole should also be selected in part by running style: Heel strikers often need additional cushioning beneath the rearfoot, while midfoot strikers typically prefer zero-drop midsoles. In almost all situations, even extremely flat-footed runners should think twice about wearing heavy motion- control running shoes because they may dampen sensory input from the foot and their extreme stiffness often results in ankle and/or knee injuries.

In order to identify the midsole that is right, experiment with a range of running shoes until you find just the right thickness, stiffness and downward slope.

Though rarely discussed, perhaps the most important attributes of a midsole is its overall stiffness. In my experience, the stiffness of a running shoe midsole is the most important factor associated with comfort and injury prevention. You can easily evaluate midsole stiffness by twisting it in several directions while grabbing the heel and forefoot.

There is a surprising amount of variation in midsole stiffness, as running shoes will bend with anywhere from 5-50 pounds of force. The best running shoes will bend with very little pressure, allowing your feet to move freely in all directions.

Unfortunately, manufacturers rarely provide information regarding overall stiffness, and it is important for runners to know the precise degree of midsole stiffness that is most comfortable for them. High-arched runners tend to be drawn to extremely flexible midsoles, while low-arched runners usually prefer a slightly stiffer midsole. The extremely stiff midsoles are almost universally uncomfortable.

The bottom line with all the research on running shoe prescription is that you are always the best judge of which running shoe is right for you. However, keep in mind that heavy motion-control shoes may interfere with proprioception, while minimalist running shoes, such as the "five-finger" running shoes, are too thin to provide adequate protection and have recently been proven to produce very high injury rates. As a general rule, most runners will do best with lightweight stability shoes that match the shape of their feet.

Thomas Michaud, DC, is the author of Injury-Free Running

We thought this was a good article for runners looking for shoes and questions they can ask at the running stores when your buying a new pair of shoes.  If you have any type of running injuries with foot pain, ankle pain, achiile pain and knee pain please feel free to contact Lyn Lake Chiropractic or find a good sports chiropractor

 

Read Less

Running Shoe, Which is right for you!

March 26, 2014

Which Type of Running Shoe Is Right for You?

Because runners with different arch heights are prone to different injuries, running shoe manufacturers have developed motion-control, stability and cushion running shoes for low-, neutral- and high-arched runners, respectively.

To control the excessive pronation present in low-arched individuals, motion-control running shoes have added midsole material beneath the center of the arch. On the other side of the spectrum, cushion Quick read more or view full article running shoes are made for runners with high arches and are manufactured with a curve-lasted shape designed to fit the typical high-arched foot.

In order to improve shock absorption, the midsoles in cushion running shoes are significantly softer. To fit runners with neutral feet, stability running shoes are made with semi-curved lasts and only a moderate amount of midsole cushioning.

For more than 30 years, running shoe manufacturers have suggested that prescribing running shoes based on arch height will reduce injury rates and increase comfort. Surprisingly, despite the fact that consumers have spent billions of dollars for just the right running shoe, there is conflicting evidence suggesting the prescription of running shoes based on arch height is clinically justified.

Arch Height, Shoe Type and Injury Rates

In one of the largest studies done to date, Knapik, et al., divided 1,400 male and female Marine Corps recruits into two groups: an experimental group in which running shoe recommendation was based on arch height, and a control group that wore neutral stability running shoes regardless of arch height. After the subjects completed an intensive 12-week training regimen, the authors concluded that prescribing running shoes according to arch height was not necessary, since there was no difference in injury rates between the two groups.

In another study evaluating the value of prescribing running shoes according to arch height, Ryan, et al., categorized 81 female runners as supinators, neutral or pronators, and then randomly assigned them to wear neutral, stability or motion-control running shoes. Again, the authors concluded that there was no correlation between foot type, running shoe use and the frequency of reported pain.

One of the more interesting findings of this research was that the individuals classified as pronators reported greater levels of pain when wearing the motion-control running shoes. This is consistent with the hypothesis that excessive midsole thickness may dampen sensory input, amplifying the potential for injury because the athlete can't "feel the ground."

Supporting the belief that running shoe prescription should continue to be based on arch height, several high-quality laboratory studies have shown that the different types of running shoes actually do what they are supposed to do: Motion-control running shoes have been proven to limit pronation, and cushion running shoes have been proven to improve shock absorption.

To prove this, researchers measured arch height and evaluated impact forces, tibial accelerations, and the range and speed of pronation after high- and low-arched runners were randomly assigned to wear cushion and motion-control running shoes. The detailed analysis confirmed that motion-control running shoes do, in fact, control rearfoot motion better than cushion running shoes; and cushion running shoes attenuate shock better than motion-control running shoes.

In a study evaluating the effect of motion-control versus neutral shoes on overpronators, Cheung and Ng used electrical devices to measure muscle activity as subjects ran 10 kilometers. The authors noted that when wearing motion-control shoes, runners who pronated excessively reported reduced muscular fatigue in the front and sides of their legs.

In a separate study of excessive supinators, Wegener, et al., evaluated pressure along the bottom of the foot when high-arched individuals wore either cushion running shoes or motion-control shoes. The authors confirmed that the cushion running shoes more effectively distributed pressure and were perceived as being more comfortable than the motion-control running shoes.

The results of the previously listed studies suggest the practice of choosing running shoes based on arch height has merit, particularly for people on the far ends of the arch height spectrum.

Which Running Shoe? The Most Important Factors to Consider

When you look at all of the research evaluating running shoe prescription and injury, it becomes clear that the most important factors to consider when selecting a running shoe are that it fits the foot perfectly (width, length and shape), and that the midsole is comfortable. The size of the shoe is determined by matching the widest part of the forefoot to the widest part of the toe box, and there should be a few millimeters of space between the tip of the longest toe and the end of the running shoe. The shoe's upper also should comfortably fit the shape of the foot.

An important factor to consider when prescribing a running shoe is that the midsole should also be selected in part by running style: Heel strikers often need additional cushioning beneath the rearfoot, while midfoot strikers typically prefer zero-drop midsoles. In almost all situations, even extremely flat-footed runners should think twice about wearing heavy motion- control running shoes because they may dampen sensory input from the foot and their extreme stiffness often results in ankle and/or knee injuries.

In order to identify the midsole that is right, experiment with a range of running shoes until you find just the right thickness, stiffness and downward slope.

Though rarely discussed, perhaps the most important attributes of a midsole is its overall stiffness. In my experience, the stiffness of a running shoe midsole is the most important factor associated with comfort and injury prevention. You can easily evaluate midsole stiffness by twisting it in several directions while grabbing the heel and forefoot.

There is a surprising amount of variation in midsole stiffness, as running shoes will bend with anywhere from 5-50 pounds of force. The best running shoes will bend with very little pressure, allowing your feet to move freely in all directions.

Unfortunately, manufacturers rarely provide information regarding overall stiffness, and it is important for runners to know the precise degree of midsole stiffness that is most comfortable for them. High-arched runners tend to be drawn to extremely flexible midsoles, while low-arched runners usually prefer a slightly stiffer midsole. The extremely stiff midsoles are almost universally uncomfortable.

The bottom line with all the research on running shoe prescription is that you are always the best judge of which running shoe is right for you. However, keep in mind that heavy motion-control shoes may interfere with proprioception, while minimalist running shoes, such as the "five-finger" running shoes, are too thin to provide adequate protection and have recently been proven to produce very high injury rates. As a general rule, most runners will do best with lightweight stability shoes that match the shape of their feet.

Thomas Michaud, DC, is the author of Injury-Free Running

We thought this was a good article for runners looking for shoes and questions they can ask at the running stores when your buying a new pair of shoes.  If you have any type of running injuries with foot pain, ankle pain, achiile pain and knee pain please feel free to contact Lyn Lake Chiropractic or find a good sports chiropractor

 

Read Less

Sports chiropractor for a running injury?

February 1, 2014

The cycle of many running injuries goes something like this: After admitting that the pain was more than just soreness, you listened to your orthopedic surgeon talk about options ranging from surgery to rehabilitation. You spent months in physical therapy trying to rebuild strength and repair soft tissue damage, eventually hitting a plateau, only to wonder if you'll ever go out for a run again. Avoid Running injuries be pro-active in your care.

The desire to get back out to run is why many runners seek alternative rehabilitation plans that include seeing a sports chiropractor for targeted treatments for their injuries. In my case, after two months in physical therapy, my pain was shifting from my hip to Quick read more or view full article my iliotibial band and psoas muscle, and I knew that it was time to try something new if I ever wanted to run again (or even sit for any length of time).

Why see a sports chiropractor for a running injury?

Although physical therapy is often the first line of defense in rehabbing a running injury, many athletes and runners have started to rely on sports medicine-trained chiropractors. While physical therapy can focus on strengthening and coordination, chiropractic care is designed to improve joint mobilization, making sure that all the joints in the body are moving correctly. Sports chiropractic care has evolved to incorporate the best of both worlds of joint mobilization techniques and soft tissue repair, creating a new gold standard of best practices in treatment plans for patients.

Lyn Lake Chiropractic emphasizes that not only do all the joints in the body need to move correctly, but they also need to move in coordination with the soft tissue – a healthy body is one where all the factors are working well together. Runners who decide to visit a sports chiropractor should expect, according to Lyn Lake Chiropractic a thorough evaluation of bio-mechanics by their chiropractor, including:

• How they are moving.

• How they are standing.

• What the arch of the foot looks like.

• How the knees are aligned.

• How the hips are aligned.

Once an evaluation is completed, sports chiropractors will create the "recipe for the treatment stew" – taking into account the needs of each specific patient to decide between a variety of techniques, each designed to help the body regenerate healthy cells to "activate healing mechanisms."

Four types of chiropractic treatment for running injuries 

1. Active Release Technique (ART) is a combination of massage and stretching where trained chiropractors apply deep tension while they move a joint through a range of motion. ART is used primarily for adhesions deep in the muscle.

2. Graston Technique is a therapy best used for surface level scar tissue that uses handheld stainless steel tools to break down scar tissue-releasing adhesions.

3. Functional dry needling ( aka: Deep Tissue Massage ) is used for very deep trigger points to release tension in the muscles through deep muscle stimulation provided by the needles. Dry needling can be helpful for injuries involving the psoas muscle, which is a critical hip flexor muscle for runners.

4. Electrical muscle stimulation (EMS) stimulates surface muscles to contract releasing tension as a complement to other techniques.

Active Release Technique for runners 

After three months of not being able to run, in almost constant pain ranging from my iliotibial band to the back of my hip and then into my psoas muscle, I was admittedly ready for anything when my orthopedist suggested trying Active Release Technique. According our chiropractor, the reason that Active Release Technique can be beneficial – especially for iliotibial band and hip injuries – is that it combines different muscle work that breaks down scar tissue while also emphasizing correct flexibility. Through Active Release, as our chiropractor explains, you can actually "elongate some of the muscle fibers making those muscles more pliable and therefore healthier."

Anyone preparing for ART should know that this is not a particularly gentle treatment. I tried telling myself that it would be like a deep tissue massage, which I enjoy, although I quickly learned that while highly effective (after three weeks my pain, though still there, was incrementally improving), the pressure and work on the muscles is deep and sometimes painful.

How to stay healthy for the long term

Staying healthy is a constant concern for professional athletes who get constant care from stretching to active release to heat or ice. Most adults or mature athletes, on the other hand, do not make the time every day to use a foam roller, apply ice or heat or keep up with stretching. Runners who have overcome an injury should consider ongoing preventive care, ranging from every two weeks to every six weeks to maintain progress and reduce future injuries.

Spring is coming soon, so when you start your spring training don’t forget to keep Lyn Lake Chiropractic the Official Chiropractor Of The Twin Cities Marathon on your speed dial.  Call if you have any questions or need some quick TLC to keep you running.

chiropractic minneapols 55408

 
Read Less

Sports chiropractor for a running injury?

February 1, 2014

The cycle of many running injuries goes something like this: After admitting that the pain was more than just soreness, you listened to your orthopedic surgeon talk about options ranging from surgery to rehabilitation. You spent months in physical therapy trying to rebuild strength and repair soft tissue damage, eventually hitting a plateau, only to wonder if you'll ever go out for a run again. Avoid Running injuries be pro-active in your care.

The desire to get back out to run is why many runners seek alternative rehabilitation plans that include seeing a sports chiropractor for targeted treatments for their injuries. In my case, after two months in physical therapy, my pain was shifting from my hip to Quick read more or view full article my iliotibial band and psoas muscle, and I knew that it was time to try something new if I ever wanted to run again (or even sit for any length of time).

Why see a sports chiropractor for a running injury?

Although physical therapy is often the first line of defense in rehabbing a running injury, many athletes and runners have started to rely on sports medicine-trained chiropractors. While physical therapy can focus on strengthening and coordination, chiropractic care is designed to improve joint mobilization, making sure that all the joints in the body are moving correctly. Sports chiropractic care has evolved to incorporate the best of both worlds of joint mobilization techniques and soft tissue repair, creating a new gold standard of best practices in treatment plans for patients.

Lyn Lake Chiropractic emphasizes that not only do all the joints in the body need to move correctly, but they also need to move in coordination with the soft tissue – a healthy body is one where all the factors are working well together. Runners who decide to visit a sports chiropractor should expect, according to Lyn Lake Chiropractic a thorough evaluation of bio-mechanics by their chiropractor, including:

• How they are moving.

• How they are standing.

• What the arch of the foot looks like.

• How the knees are aligned.

• How the hips are aligned.

Once an evaluation is completed, sports chiropractors will create the "recipe for the treatment stew" – taking into account the needs of each specific patient to decide between a variety of techniques, each designed to help the body regenerate healthy cells to "activate healing mechanisms."

Four types of chiropractic treatment for running injuries 

1. Active Release Technique (ART) is a combination of massage and stretching where trained chiropractors apply deep tension while they move a joint through a range of motion. ART is used primarily for adhesions deep in the muscle.

2. Graston Technique is a therapy best used for surface level scar tissue that uses handheld stainless steel tools to break down scar tissue-releasing adhesions.

3. Functional dry needling ( aka: Deep Tissue Massage ) is used for very deep trigger points to release tension in the muscles through deep muscle stimulation provided by the needles. Dry needling can be helpful for injuries involving the psoas muscle, which is a critical hip flexor muscle for runners.

4. Electrical muscle stimulation (EMS) stimulates surface muscles to contract releasing tension as a complement to other techniques.

Active Release Technique for runners 

After three months of not being able to run, in almost constant pain ranging from my iliotibial band to the back of my hip and then into my psoas muscle, I was admittedly ready for anything when my orthopedist suggested trying Active Release Technique. According our chiropractor, the reason that Active Release Technique can be beneficial – especially for iliotibial band and hip injuries – is that it combines different muscle work that breaks down scar tissue while also emphasizing correct flexibility. Through Active Release, as our chiropractor explains, you can actually "elongate some of the muscle fibers making those muscles more pliable and therefore healthier."

Anyone preparing for ART should know that this is not a particularly gentle treatment. I tried telling myself that it would be like a deep tissue massage, which I enjoy, although I quickly learned that while highly effective (after three weeks my pain, though still there, was incrementally improving), the pressure and work on the muscles is deep and sometimes painful.

How to stay healthy for the long term

Staying healthy is a constant concern for professional athletes who get constant care from stretching to active release to heat or ice. Most adults or mature athletes, on the other hand, do not make the time every day to use a foam roller, apply ice or heat or keep up with stretching. Runners who have overcome an injury should consider ongoing preventive care, ranging from every two weeks to every six weeks to maintain progress and reduce future injuries.

Spring is coming soon, so when you start your spring training don’t forget to keep Lyn Lake Chiropractic the Official Chiropractor Of The Twin Cities Marathon on your speed dial.  Call if you have any questions or need some quick TLC to keep you running.

chiropractic minneapols 55408

 
Read Less

Fun Running Facts!

September 21, 2011
Since the Medtronics Twin Cities Marathon is only 11 days away, and with the expo starting in 9 days.  We thought some fun trivia information would be cool to post!  We've found these postings throughout the website!  Enjoy!

Why do I get side stitches?
That pain that rips through your midsection, usually on the right side? Chalk it up to the act of breathing. Or, more accurately, to your diaphragm, the muscle that controls your breathing motion. "It attaches to the liver on the right side," says Dr. Wyrick. "When you run, the attaching ligaments stretch, which stresses the diaphragm and causes pain."

Running Rx Slow down or walk so you can take deep, full breaths. Grabbing your right side and squeezing it to support the liver may also end the pain. Another option: When your left foot hits the ground, exhale, which causes your diaphragm to rise; Quick read more or view full article inhale on your right foot, and it falls down, which decreases the stretching. Finally, keep training. Side stitches typically happen to beginners. "Over time, the ligaments become conditioned to the stress," says Dr. Wyrick.

Why do my toenails go black?
For regular runners, a black toenail is not a matter of if, it's when," says Dr. Bright. Three causes of the black badge: a too-short shoe; a toenail that comes into contact with the roof of the shoe too often; and a runner who uses his toes to grip too hard. However it happens, the result is the same. Blood vessels under the nail break open, which spill blood (which looks black under the opaque nail) into the area between the toe bed and the toenail. "That area isn't accommodating to blood collection: It's rigid and restrictive," says Dr. Bright. "It builds up a lot of pressure quickly."

Running Rx If the pressure is bothering you and you can handle more hurt, press the end of a paper clip or safety pin, heated with a match, through the nail. "That's a pretty painful proposition," says Dr. Bright, who recommends the gentler touch of a doctor. Do it sooner, while the blood is still fluid. If the pain decreases and doesn't bother you, no need to take action. Either way, the skin below it will heal, the nail will die and fall off. Don't worry, it'll grow back someday.

Why am I so sore after a marathon, when I've done 22-mile training runs?
Did you do your training runs with crowds yelling at you and competitors around you unconsciously prompting you to run faster? Thought not. Whether you're a 2:30 or a 5:30 marathoner, your race-day pace tends to be at least a smidge—and possibly lots—faster than training days. That's the difference, says Dr. Bright, between being pleasantly and painfully sore. "You accumulate lactic acid in your muscles by pushing the pace, which brings on premature fatigue," says Dr. Bright. "Plus, the extra mileage—very few people do a 26-mile training run—causes more micro tears in your muscles, and it's likely your muscles haven't totally healed from your training. Race day, they get even more beat up." The combination nets marathonitis, an acute condition that demands stairs be taken backward and the size of a stride be cut in half.

Running Rx A huge fan of ice baths, Dr. Bright recommends the anti-inflammatory plunge, postrace, for at least five to 10 minutes. Don't bother taking NSAIDs like ibuprofen. "The newer studies show they really don't do that much for inflammation," says Dr. Bright. "And they can potentially put your kidneys at risk."

Why does coffee speed up more than just my legs?
A pre-run prereq for many runners to clear the system on their own terms, java stimulates the muscles in the GI tract faster than Mother Nature; some reports say coffee jolts your system in as little as four minutes. Once you're out on the road, proceed with caution: Many energy gels have caffeine in them, which may cause your intestines to move as quickly as your legs.

Running Rx In the weeks before an important run or race, determine how much coffee you need for an evac, then sip and lighten your load accordingly. Also, figure out if you can tolerate caffeinated gels. Plan B: Pick a route with a few public restrooms along the way, so you can properly do your business.


Why does the inside of one ankle get bloody from being hit by the opposite heel, but not the other?
That red tattoo is called a heel whip, and it's from excessive rotational motion of your foot. Instead of your foot traveling in a forward plane, it makes an arc, causing your heel to nick your anklebone. It doesn't have to be gory: Heel whips can also just dirty your inside shin. "The extra torsion can be caused by anything from the alignment in your ankle to a hip issue," says Dicharry, who adds that one side usually bears the bloody brunt because of muscular imbalances.

Running Rx Think about pushing off through the big toe, not the pinky toe, so that your foot swings cleanly forward, and you'll whip your ankle less. If you need more than just a Band-Aid after a run (e.g., ice packs and Advil for various parts of your lower body), a visit to a physical therapist will help you determine whether you have strength imbalances that can be corrected with single-leg exercises.

Why does my GI tract act up when I'm running?
Some people get headaches when they're stressed. Runners get the trots. A 2008 study on 1,281 Dutch runners found that at least 45 percent complained of some gastro-related issue during the run. "The GI tract is very sensitive to stress, and running—or the anticipation before a race—is definitely stressful," says Darrin Bright, M.D., family physician and sports medicine specialist in Columbus, Ohio.

When you run, your intestines take a double hit: The motion jostles their contents and speeds things along. Plus, blood, essential for your tract to stay on track, is rerouted to vital organs and muscles in your lower half, disrupting the sensitive balance your body has for fluid absorption and possibly causing dehydration, which can lead to cramps that force you to beeline for the bathroom.

Running Rx Dr. Bright recommends putting the ix-nay on bathroom-inducing high-fiber and high-fat foods 24 hours before a race or long run, and fueling up on benign, already-tested, plain meals.


If you have any questions, thoughts please feel free to contact us.  Lyn Lake Chiropractic will be at the Twin Cities Marathon Expo on Friday and Saturday.  Stop by the booth and say hi, remember to wear your Lyn Lake Chiropractic Running Shirt!

If you have any Running Injuries please check out our website for more information.http://www.lynlakechiropractic.com/page.cfm?pageid=14893
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For Runners, Soft Ground Can Be Hard on the Body

August 24, 2011

For Runners, Soft Ground Can Be Hard on the Body

By Gina Kolata writer for the New York Times.

Hirofumi Tanaka, an exercise physiologist at the University of Texas at Austin, bristles when he sees dirt paths carved out of the grass along paved bicycling or running routes. The paths are created by runners who think softer ground protects them from injuries.

Dr. Tanaka, a runner, once tried it himself. He was recovering from a knee pain, injury and an orthopedist told him to stay away from hard surfaces, like asphalt roads, and run instead on softer surfaces, like grass or dirt. So he ran on a dirt path runners had beaten into the grass along an asphalt bike path.

The result? “I twisted my ankle and aggravated my injury while running on the softer and irregular surface,” he said.

In the aftermath of his accident, Dr. Tanaka said he Quick read more or view full article could not find any scientific evidence that a softer surface is beneficial to runners, nor could other experts he asked. In fact, it makes just as much sense to reason that runners are more likely to get injured on soft surfaces, which often are irregular, than on smooth, hard ones, he said.

His experience makes me wonder. Is there a good reason why many runners think a soft surface is gentler on their feet and limbs? Or is this another example of a frequent error we all make, trusting what seems like common sense and never asking if the conventional wisdom is correct?

Perhaps a runner who, like me, strikes the ground with her forefoot instead of her heel, might risk more injuries on softer ground. After all, every time I push off on a soft surface, I twist my foot.

Exercise researchers say there are no rigorous gold-standard studies in which large numbers of people were assigned to run on soft or hard surfaces, then followed to compare injury rates.

There’s a good reason for that, said Stuart J. Warden, director of the Indiana Center for Translational Musculoskeletal Research at Indiana University. It’s too hard to recruit large numbers of people willing to be randomly assigned to one surface or another for their runs.

“I think the reason people haven’t answered that question is that it is not an easy question to answer,” Dr. Warden said.

When Dr. Willem van Mechelen, head of public and occupational health at VU University Medical Center in Amsterdam, searched for published studies on running injuries and how to prevent them, he, too, concluded that there were no good studies that directly support running on softer ground. “Significantly not associated with running injuries seem age, gender, body mass index, running hills, running on hard surfaces, participation in other sports, time of the year and time of the day,” Dr. van Mechelen concluded.

So what is going on? It seems obvious that the forces on your legs and feet are different depending on whether you run on soft packed dirt or on hard concrete. Why aren’t injury rates affected?

An answer that many accept comes from studies that addressed the question indirectly. In several of them, study subjects ran on plates that measured the force with which they struck the ground. Instead of varying the hardness of the ground, the researchers varied the cushioning of the shoes. More cushioning approximated running on softer ground.

Over and over again, studies like these found that the body automatically adjusts to different surfaces — at least, as mimicked by cushioning in shoes — to keep forces constant when foot strikes plate.

That finding makes sense, Dr. Warden said. If you jump from a table to the floor, you automatically bend your knees when you land. If you jump on a trampoline, you can keep your knees stiff when you land. Something similar happens when you run on different surfaces.

“If you run on a hard surface, your body decreases its stiffness,” Dr. Warden said. “Your knees and hips flex more. On a soft surface, your legs stiffen.” Running on a soft surface “is basically a different activity,” he said.

But those studies did not actually measure forces inside the body, Dr. van Mechelen noted. Instead, they used biomechanical modeling to estimate those forces.

“It is models, so God knows whether it is true,” Dr. van Mechelen said. “But to me it doesn’t seem far-fetched.”

Dr. Warden said some people adapt quicker than others to running surfaces, and he advised that anyone wanting to change from a soft to a hard surface, or vice versa, play it safe and make the change gradually.

Changing your running surface, Dr. Warden said, “is much like increasing your mileage, changing your shoes or some other aspect of your training program.” Abrupt changes can be risky.

But with no evidence that softer surfaces prevent injuries, there is no reason to run on softer ground unless you like to, Dr. Warden and other experts said. Dr. van Mechelen tells runners to get a pair of comfortable shoes and run on whatever surface they prefer.

Dr. van Mechelen, a runner himself, says his favorite surface is asphalt. Mine is too.

My coach, Tom Fleming, never suggested soft surfaces and never thought they prevented injuries. And, he said, there’s a good reason to run on asphalt, at least if you want to compete.

“Most road races are on hard roadways,” he told me. “So let’s get used to them.”

I just thought this article is something to think about since most of the runners training in the twin cities run along the river road or around the chain of lakes in Minneapolis.  As every runner knows, next to all the asphalt running paths there's this dirt path that many runners and walkers have created.  I myself enjoy going back and forth from hard surface to the dirt path on my long runs. In conclusion, I would say, do whatever works for you and most importantly: enjoy the run!

The best advice I can give any runner that is having any type of pain and seeking medical advice.  Take advice from a doctor who owns some running shoes.

Lyn Lake Chiropractic has been the Official Chiropractors of The Twin Cities Marathon for many years.  Runners Treating Runners!

If you have any issues, please call, email or stop by and take the time to talk to one of the doctors that do own a pair of running shoes!

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We see a lot of knee injuries

March 16, 2011
We see a lot of knee injuries in chiropractic care, or people who suffer from knee pain. Chiropractic care is sometimes seen as alternative, especially when it comes to knee pain, to orthopaedic care. The chiropractor’s approach to knee pain includes an evaluation for possible spinal or pelvic involvement in addition to local knee dysfunction.

Knee pain can come from many sources like the following and the knee is unguarded and exposed to hostile elements, rendering it open to knee pain:
1. Injuries resulting from impact, running
2. Heavy blows to the knee from outside causes
3. Dashboard related afflictions with car accidents
4. Falls with direct impact

Soft tissue injuries resulting in knee pain are usually the result of either overuse or disuse. Some common presentations to a chiropractor’s office include:
1. Player of sports, runners, cyclist presenting with anterior knee pain. aka: runners knee.
2. Senior person suffering stiffness and knee pain.
3. Quick read more or view full article Young player with ache over the tibial tuberosity.
4. Person complaining of knee instability.

Knee pain treatment modality usually takes on a conservative stance. Most knee pain responds very well to a combination of non-invasive treatments such as chiropractic adjustments, Ultrasound, Laser, massage, applying heat or cold, exercise to strengthen the muscles that support the knee and temporarily restraining from activities that aggravate the knee pain.

To identify the true cause of your knee pain, Lyn Lake Chiropractic will initiate the following pre-treatment processes: take a detailed history, examine you and do neurological and orthopaedic testing and perform radiologic tests. Then a plan of management specifically for your case will be designed by your treating chiropractor.

Spring is here and everyone will be starting to push themselves again getting back into shape. Take it easy and if you have any pain, don't wait until the injury stops your activity or sport. See your chiropractor or call Lyn Lake Chiropractic for a Free Consultation to see if we can help. When in doubt we will refer you to an orthopedic clinic we feel can help you! Read Less

More Injuries As Runners Head Outside

March 4, 2011
By Reg Chapman, WCCO-TV - News March 2011

MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — No matter how cold it gets, hardcore runners will always train. So, this winter has been rough.

Doctors across the metro are seeing an increase in people coming to their offices with injuries related to running on snow and ice.

Lots of snow, ice and fluctuating temperatures have left many of the trails and paths hard to navigate.

“I have a calf strain and that’s mainly because of the winter conditions, uneven pavement and ice and snow,” said runner Eric Hoglund.
Hoglund’s training for the Boston Marathon is on hold until the doctors at Lyn Lake Chiropractic help heal what hurts him.

Lyn Lake Chiropractic seen a steady flow of runners coming in with injuries.
“A lot of calfs, foot pain and ankle pain, hamstrings and then low back pain injuries. That seems to be the biggest thing now, due to the snow and ice,” said Quick read more or view full article Dr. Jill Field from Lyn Lake Chiropractic.

Dr. Jill Field says running where the ground is not clear is the cause of most runner’s pain.

“The foot hits the ground, it has a little bit more wobble to it, because it’s not a firm solid surface and then the hamstrings come into play because now we are trying to push off, but when we push off, the foot slips a little bit, “said Dr. Field.

While Dr. Jill Field chiropractor at Lyn Lake Chiropractic helps heal, John Long, the owner at Marathon Sports, is helping people feel a bit more at ease running in winter conditions.

All his employees are runners. They’ve been posting conditions of the trails around the lakes, the greenway and Minnehaha creek on the store’s Face book page. “The staff would say, ‘hey, this is what we thought the trails look like today’ and update and a lot of people on our face book would make their own comments, ” said Long.

Dr Jill Field says most runner’s injuries happen in the early morning, when the trails are icy or packed down and wobbly from lots of use the night before.
Chiropractors at Lyn Lake Chiropractic advice for runners: Know your limitations and if your body feels like it is working too hard to run, listen to it and slow down — at least until the snow and ice melts. Read Less

Website to Better Serve Minneapolis, MN

February 3, 2011
Lyn Lake Chiropractic Launches New Website to Better Serve Minneapolis, MN


Lyn Lake Chiropractic announces the launch of their new Minneapolis, MN Website. With improved functionality, additional information and more interactive features, they hope to better serve their patients and provide them with the resources they need to make informed decisions regarding their health and wellness.


Minneapolis, MN (PRWEB) February 3, 2011

Lyn Lake Chiropractic has launched a new Website to better serve the Minneapolis, MN community and their patients. In addition to providing helpful information on common chiropractic injuries and treatments, the updated site features a regularly maintained blog, FAQ section and links to resourceful articles.

For over ten years, the chiropractors at Lyn Lake have been committed to providing breakthrough pain treatment. Their goal is to relieve pain and discomfort and help patients maintain a comfortable, productive and healthy lifestyle. From chronic back and neck pain, to whiplash and auto accident Quick read more or view full article injuries, they utilize cutting edge technology and techniques to help patients achieve maximum results.

“We have always strived to stay up to date with the best technology and practices in our industry,” says Dr. Kevin Schreifels, Doctor of Chiropractic and owner of Lyn Lake Chiropractic. “We see the new site as a way for us to better explain some of the common sources of pain that people experience as well as answer many of the questions they may have before they visit the clinic.”


In addition to being informative, http://www.lynlakechiropractic.com now offers links to their Twitter, Facebook and YouTube profiles. “We want to provide our patients with as much information as possible, in the format that they prefer.

Whether they want to post on our Facebook page, or ask us a question through our Online form, we believe that it’s important to provide a means for a two-way interaction,” says Schreifels. “We would love the opportunity to treat the people who visit the site. But ultimately, we want to provide the community with a resource to help them make informed decisions about their health."

Lyn Lake Chiropractic clinic has a talented team of experienced chiropractors, massage therapists and personal trainers. They also offer a breadth of other services such as chiropractic for children and the elderly, chiropractic for pregnant women, treatments for headaches, running injuries, sports injuries, and other special add-on services such as nutritional counseling, lifestyle advice, and massage therapy.

To schedule your free consultation call the clinic’s 24-hour answering service at (612) 879-8000 or visit Lyn Lake Chiropractic at 2937 Lyndale Avenue South, Minneapolis MN. The clinic also accepts walk-ins and “just driving by” appointments.

For more information about Lyn Lake Chiropractic visit http://www.lynlakechiropractic.com or take a virtual tour of the clinic at http://www.youtube.com/user/lynlakechiro. Read Less

Twin Cities Marathon - Lyn Lake Chiropractic

September 30, 2010
Stop by Lyn Lake Chiropractic's booth this weekend at the Health & Expo. We'll have our doctors working the expo. We'll be providing massage and Kinesio - Taping for any athlete that needs a little support to help you get to the finish line.

We have professional photographer at the marathon taking pictures of anyone wearing our Lyn Lake Chiropractic shirts. Checkout our website next week, or stop by the clinic for more photo's of your race!

Lyn Lake Chiropractic is the Official Chiropractors of the Medtronic Twin Cities Marathon. Runners treating Runners!!!

Health & Fitness Expo - October 1 - 2, 2010


HEALTH & FITNESS EXPO
Friday, October 1 12:00 - 8:00 p.m. and
Saturday, October 2 10 a.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Saint Paul RiverCentre, 175 West Kellogg Boulevard, St. Paul

Along with race number and packet pick-up, you’ll find hands-on health and fitness exhibits, great bargains on running and fitness gear, Quick read more or view full article free sampling, free massages, information on equipment, nutrition and other races. Medtronic Twin Cities Marathon merchandise will be available for sale including posters, kids’ and adults’ apparel, novelty items, and more. The Health & Fitness Expo is free and open to the public. Read Less

Good Luck tonight at the TC 1 miler

May 13, 2010
Lyn Lake Chiropractic just want to cheer and send positive energy to all the runners at the TC 1 Miler Race in Minneapolis tonight. Look for Meghan Armstrong, Lance Elliot, Garret Heath and Heather Domiden. Runners know the benefit of chiropractic and with have the best body biomechanics with regular chiropractic care. Avoid running injuries, get to your local chiropractor.

Lyn Lake Chiropractic supports all the local runners, triathletes and every weekend runner!
"Runners Treating Runners"....If your down at the race look for our running shirts, we'll all be there!

Feel the Runner's High

April 15, 2010
Feel the Runner's High

For too many people, the only time they'll even consider running is if they're being chased! The truth is running can be easy and fun to do. It's inexpensive, readily available, can be done at just about any age, makes you feel years younger and has massive health benefits. (And if you ever do find yourself being chased for any reason, it would be nice to be able to outrun your chaser!)

By implementing a few simple strategies, you can take running to heights never imagined.

What's the difference between jogging and running?

This distinction might seem obvious, but it's actually an important one: Running means you are moving at a faster pace than jogging. Technically, if it takes you less than nine minutes to complete one mile, you are running. If it takes you more than nine minutes, you are jogging. Jogging is harder than walking because Quick read more or view full article it requires more muscle to go faster, breathe deeper, and maintain proper balance. Running requires more effort than jogging and is more intense. It requires stamina to go faster and endurance to go for longer periods of time.

It is always best to start jogging regularly for approximately one month before progressing to running; this will build up your body's ability to handle the additional stresses and pounding of the joints.

Start Slow, End Slow

Stretching is an important part of most workout routines, running included. Unfortunately, stretching is the first thing that gets left out if you are in a hurry or you're trying to squeeze in your exercise for the day. You should be stretching before and after you run. Even five minutes of stretching before to warm up your muscles and five minutes of stretching after for a cool-down can prevent serious injury. I normally recommend 15-20 minutes of stretching to my patients before and after their workouts.

There are many different stretches. Regardless of which ones you choose to do, make sure you stretch into comfort and not pain. If a stretch is hurting, back off or don't do it. Pain is an indicator that something is wrong, and pushing past this point can invite injury to your door.

Since we all run at different paces, try the following protocol the next time you finish stretching. After stretching, begin walking at a slow, comfortable pace. After a few minutes, increase your pace gradually to a faster walk, then to a light jog and then into your full, usual running speed. Obviously, the time it takes you to get to a full run will vary, but it is a nice way of getting your body into the groove. Once you are almost finished with your run, gradually slowing your pace to a walk is a nice

Running is one of the best forms of aerobic conditioning for your heart and lungs. It can significantly increase your metabolic rate and the amount of calories you burn, leading to loss of excess body fat. Running is also beneficial for slowing down the aging process.

Those who run regularly are less likely to experience bone and muscle loss due to the body's positive response to additional physical demands.

Running can also have many psychological benefits. Most runners typically report being happier and feeling less stressed from the grind of daily life. Why? Because regular exercise has the ability to alter mood, attributable to a surge in hormones called endorphins. These hormones create a sense of euphoria often referred to as a "runner's high" and can result in an improvement in mood.

Here are some great tips, courtesy of running coach Chipper Robinson from Running on the Edge in Ramsey, N.J., on how to maximize your running experience:


Incorporate cross training into your running routines. Add weight-lifting, bicycling, yoga, elliptical training, or swimming. Why? They make you fitter and less prone to injury.

Exercise your abdominal muscles almost every day. A strong midsection (core) is a key component to running. In fact, it can often be the single most important factor for success in long-distance running.

Change your intensity levels by running faster or farther. Alternate which one you choose to implement in various workouts. It prevents your body from adapting to routines.

Pay attention to your shoes. Most shoes wear out after 300 to 500 miles. You often can't see the wear, but, your knees, hips, and back will feel it.

Run on different surfaces. See how many different surfaces you can run on in a month: asphalt, gravel, trail, grass, track, treadmill, and beach. Each stresses your leg muscles in a slightly different way, helping to prevent overuse injuries. (If possible, avoid concrete, the hardest and most harmful surface for runners.)

Keep a training journal. A journal can be a great way to maintain motivation and consistency. Keep it filled with running times, routines, motivational quotes, and how your body reacts to various routines. You should have a documented road map for reaching your running goals.

Take some time off. You don't have to run every day, every week, or even every month (as long as you're performing other cardiovascular activities). For healthy, consistent training, your body needs regular recovery periods. Performance suffers with too much exercise. Start slow and work your way toward higher mileages and/or more frequency.

Introduce high-intensity interval training into your running routine. Alternate, pace, speed, tempo and rest periods during a single running session. For example, keep a steady pace for a mile and then sprint run for 30 seconds. Do this for several cycles and notice how your heart rate and muscle fatigue threshold increase.

Every great journey starts with a single step; now just put one foot in front of the other to see how far this new journey takes you. Welcome to the wonderful world of running. Talk to your doctor to learn more about the benefits of running.

Remember Lyn Lake Chiropractic is the Official Chiropractor of the Twin Cities Marathon. Runner's treating Runners. Specialize in running injuries. Call for a Free Consult! 612-879-8000 Read Less
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